King Edward VII School Magazine

VOL. X]
MARCH 1939 
[No. 2

Editors
H. F. GUITE, J. H. P. UPTON.

Hon. Sec.
Mr. E. F. WATLING.

CONTENTS

Editorial

47

Football

67

School Notes

48

Cross Country, 1939

75

School Chapel Service

49

Junior School

77

School Concert, 1938

50

The Library

78

"Saville's Camp-Winchelsea"

53

The Chess Club

79

The War in China

56

The Orchestra

79

The Visit of the Classical VIth to Cambridge, March 4th-5th, 1939

58

The Tuesday Club

80

Play Competition

60

Old Edwardians

80

Book Club Blues

62

Old Edwardians' Football Club

81

The Kid

63

Oxford Letter

82

Visit to an Armament Works

65

House Notes

83

Brave New World

66

Notices

85

   

Crossword

86

Editorial.

LAST term we said goodbye to Mr. Graham. His ten years association with the school has built up ties between him and the Staff and boys which may not easily be broken, and there can be few who have not felt his absence. Once more we take the opportunity of wishing him every success and happiness at Bradford.

An experiment has been tried this term with a view to reviving dramatic activity in the school. Forms were invited to enter plays for a Dramatic Competition. Plays of all kinds were submitted from all parts of the school and were finally performed on March 10th, 11th and 12th. The competition was a success in every way except in the support given by parents. The competitors are to be congratulated on the excellent standard of the entertain­ment. It is to be hoped that a similar event will be arranged next year.

We are pleased to observe that the number of boys who attend the Philharmonic Concerts in the City Hall is increasing. Largely through the efforts of Mr. Baylis, the school is taking an increasing interest in musical culture. Others are encouraged to take advan­tage of the cheap students' tickets available for these concerts.

School Notes.

A PARTY from the School visited the High School on Saturday, March 4th to see a performance of G. B. Shaw's St. Joan. The difficult male parts were well played and the roles of Joan and the Dauphin in particular were acted well.

•           * * *

It has been decided to give the collection this term to the Spanish Refugee Fund.

•           * * *

Hearty congratulations to B. Mayo on winning an Open Demyship at Magdalen College, Oxford.

•           * * *

.Congratulations to B. Mayo and J. H. P. Upton on being appointed Prefects.

•           * * *

On Wednesday, February 22nd, Mr. Tappe delivered an interesting lecture to the Classical Association at the University on " Theramenes : Traitor or Statesman ? "

•           * * *

Congratulations to Mr. Brearley on playing for Yorkshire Men's Hockey team throughout the season.

•           * * *

The Shout was held on Monday, December 20th and some excellent entertainment was provided. Several of the sketches were unfortunately inaudible owing to the hooliganism of some of the more uncouth of the School's cast-offs.

We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher on the birth of a daughter.

VALE.

It is twenty years, and one term, since Mr. J. HUNTER joined the Staff. His retirement at the end of this term calls for the good wishes and grateful remembrances of a long line of Edwardians, especially those in whose education Classics or Cricket, or both, had a large part. For many years after his arrival in January, 1919, Mr. Hunter had charge of the Cricket and Athletic Sports, and no small share in the Football, of the School, and more recently his administration of the finances tempered progress with economy to the great benefit of all. A happy and healthful retirement, with well-earned leisure to spend upon his native highlands, is what we all sincerely wish for him.

School Chapel Service.

THE School Chapel Service was held on Sunday, January 15th, and the address was given by the Rev. E. H. Rawlins, Vicar of Mexborough.

He said that if ever there was a fallacy it was the fallacy of the " good old days." Far from things getting worse, there was ample evidence that they were getting better ; indeed, the best was yet to be. Each one of us could play his part in making tomorrow better than today by doing his best ; and to do one's best was the highest that could he expected of any man.

But we should find ourselves unable to do our best, he assured us, if we merely relied upon our own powers ; whereas if we derived our strength from God our conduct would be worthy of His purposes. He therefore urged us to look to the future with confidence, always to strive to do our best, and to pray to God for strength and for guidance.

H.F.G.

School Concert, 1938.

PART I.
GOD SAVE THE KING.

1.

PART SONGS

(a) "Fairest Isle"

Purcel

   

(b) " Come If You Dare "

1658-95

   

(with orchestral accompaniment).

 
   

THE SCHOOL CHOIR.

 

2.

SYMPHONY IN D MAJOR

Allegro

Gossec

   

(1st Movement only).

1733-1829

   

THE ORCHESTRA.

 

3.

QUINTET. OP. 44

Allegro Brilliante

Schumann

   

(1st Movement only).

1810-56

 

CALVERT, G.H., ROGERS, H.C., JONES, D.M., MANDL, F., and REVILL, K.E.

 

4.

PART SONGS

(a) "Come Again ! Sweet Love"

Dowland 1563-1626

   

(b) " Round Around About A Wood "

Morley 1566-1604

   

A SECTION OF THE CHOIR.

 

5.

SUITE

" Water Music " No. 1

Handel

     

1685-1759

     

arr.Hamilton Harty

   

THE ORCHESTRA.

 

6.

PART SONGS

(a) "The Winter it is Past"

Traditional arr.Bullock

   

(b) " Swansea Town "

Traditional arr.Holst

   

THE SCHOOL CHOIR.

 

7.

SONATA IN D MINOR

Sicilians-Allemande-Arietta- Minuet I and II.

Defesch 1695-1758

 

Violoncello---F. MANDL.

Pianoforte-Dr. A. MANDL

 

8.

A TOY SYMPHONY ON AMERICAN AIRS

for Voices and Percussion Instruments.

Nicholls

   

THE MIDDLE SCHOOL.

 
INTERVAL OF FIFTEEN MINUTES. 
 

PART II.

   

1.

SCHERZO

 

C. Woodhouse

   

THE ORCHESTRA.

 

2.

 

PLAIN JANE,

 
   

or

 
   

The Wedding Breakfast.

 
   

(A Comic Opera in One Act).

 
 

Words by A. P. HERBERT

 

Music by RICHARD AUSTIN

   

Characters

 
 

George Surbiton

 

Mr. J. H. ATKINS.

 

Winnie (his wife)

 

Mr. A. BRADLEY

 

Jane (their daughter)

 

Mr. G. S. V. PETTER

 

The Rev. Frederick Tate

 

Mr. K. S. MCKAY

   

Scene

 
   

The Dining Room of the Surbitons.

 
 

Producer and Stage Manager-

 

Mr. E. F. WATLING

3.

CAROL

" Good King Wenceslas "

Traditional

   

THE SCHOOL CHOIR.

 

4.

 

THE SCHOOL SONG

 

THE School Orchestra has at last acquired a highly effective brass department. That was my first impression of what was in many ways a memorable concert. Far be it from me to cast aspersions on the previous industrious efforts of that section of the Orchestra : it is a lamentable fact that brass players nowa­days are as rare as oases in an arid desert, especially in a school, where if any instrument can be learned at all it is usually the piano or violin. Consequently the presence in this year's Orchestra of five trumpets, a euphonium, and rarest and most exotic of pheno­mena, a French Horn, must be regarded as a welcome augury for the future.

The programme, I thought, was eminently suitable for a school orchestra : while not too difficult, it offered scope and variety. Gossec's Symphony in D major, an interesting work by a composer of whom little is heard in England, was quite vigorously executed, although marred by slight faults of intonation. Much better, I thought, was the Handel Water Music Suite, which received robust and clear-cut treatment, and revealed also hitherto unsuspected heights of virtuosity in the brass department. This indeed was the Orchestra's best performance of the evening. Charles Woodhouse's Scherzo made a bright and lively finish to that part in the programme played by the whole Orchestra.

The Choir is by now a permanent feature of the School Concert, and it acquitted itself in its usual effective manner. Purcell, Dowland, Morley, and some traditional airs that went with a fine swing : here indeed was plenty of scope for a school choir. Fairest Isle was as charming as ever, and the rendering of Round, Around, About a Wood, and The Winter it is Past, gave a good idea of the sheer melodic beauty of this type of music ; while Swansea Town was sung with real verve and enthusiasm. I was, however, much impressed with a criticism I heard that the choir sings better when accompanied by the Orchestra, if even a small section of it, than when alone ; and one must admit that it is extremely difficult even for the best of choirs to maintain pitch when singing without accompaniment.

The quintet for strings and pianoforte by Schumann was particu­larly enjoyable. Good balance and rhythm were maintained throughout, while the freshness and vitality of the work were exhibited to the full. The intonation was exceptionally good for a work of this nature, and the general team-work was excellent. The other solo item proved the musical treat of the evening-the Sonata in D minor for 'Cello, by Defesch, played by F. Mandl and accompanied by his father. It would be difficult to praise too highly this brilliant exhibition of all the musicianly qualities, and such a performance on the part of a schoolboy was indeed remarkable. One hopes that he will be present at many School concerts to come.

The Toy Symphony provided the usual opportunity for Auntie to see Johnny on the stage and the usual difficulty for the casual observer of telling which of the two was more amused by the pro­ceedings. Still more enjoyment was provided by the Comic Opera, Plain Jane, or The Wedding Breakfast, which afforded Johnny in his turn the highly diverting spectacle of Mr.______ performing on the stage. The chance of seeing one's form master throwing dignity to the winds and exchanging passionate embraces with a very charming young lady was one not to be missed by any romantic youth who might aspire to follow in his master's footsteps. It was in this indeed light-hearted atmosphere that yet another School Concert drew to a close.

OLD STAGER."

"Saville's Camp - Winchelsea."

THE lengthening evenings, and the occasional appearance of the sun on two consecutive days, remind us that it is time we indulged in that most delicious of speculations-the plan­ning of a Summer Holiday. There is one particular type of holiday that I should like to bring to the notice of those unfortunate few who are as yet unacquainted with it, and that is Mr. Saville's camp at Winchelsea. Before attempting to recall any of the myriad different events which stay in our minds from last year's camp, I feel that I ought to give these future campers and their parents some brief outline of the camp and its life, so that they may more easily share the pleasures of our recollections.

The stranger might at first be bewildered by the wide-spread stratum of camps, bungalows, and " summer residences " which has in the past few years been settling on Winchelsea Beach, but it will not take him long, whether he enquires from the native yokelry or merely uses his own discrimination, to find that there is one camp that holds a unique and supreme position. It is not only its right of primogeniture that singles it out, but the fact that it has always since its very beginning been " Saville's Camp " ; the affection and respect with which Mr. Saville himself is regarded by apparently the entire population of Winchelsea and Rye has allowed his camp to continue in an atmosphere of independence and sublime indifference to the less pedigreed growths around it. The sea is within about a couple of hundred yards of the tents, and every day it washes an immense stretch of firm sand. The camp itself has for a sort of headquarters a converted railway. carriage, which serves to house the less hardy members, besides containing a kitchen and storehouse for the use of a cook, only one of whose accomplishments (though that a good one) seems to be cooking. Orderly duty is carried out by a squad for the day, so that " everybody " may expect to serve about once every five or six days. The sanitary arrangements are all that camp sanitary arrangements should be - simple, but effective. Meals take a properly important place in the agenda for the day : breakfast follows a morning wash which serves to sharpen the appetite to the right degree of excess, and dinner, tea, and supper are all given due attention. The days are left almost entirely free for swimming, playing " stumps," fishing, walking, or whatever you please within reason, and juniors can be perpetually joining in organised events such as local sports, cricket matches against local teams, trips into Hastings and visits to many of the more exciting places of interest in the vicinity, and the renowned day voyage in the boat. And the simple formula of sleeping in the sun is not to be despised !

Last summer the weather was ideal, and it is perhaps natural that our first thoughts should be of the wonderful days we spent playing cricket in the second week of camp. The first match was played at Tenterden in the blazing sun which was to follow us for most of the week ; the Ramblers started their tour successfully by winning this match despite the efforts of a good fast bowler on the home side, who had a gentle but strategic slope to encourage him. The match against Ashford Southern Railway unfortunately had to be cancelled, but on another broiling day the Ramblers fought out a two innings game against the Winchelsea side : here again they were victorious. The Rye ground saw us on consecutive days playing the Town and Rugby Old Guard, and two days later we had a most enjoyable game on the village ground at Beckley ; this match was made memorable by a hat-trick from Waghorn, and the total inability of Frank Morrell to bowl a full toss on the leg to a little boy of ten ! Perhaps the most exciting game of the tour was the match of Robertsbridge on the last day : by dint of very steady bowling on an iron hard wicket we disposed of the home side for 144, and it seemed that we should have a good chance of getting the runs ourselves. Our first few wickets fell quickly, however, and things began to look rather black until John Booth came in and knocked up 42 in five overs ! But again we had a collapse, and the match finished with our last pair in and 142 runs on the board. It was rather a pity that time did not allow us to settle the question, but that drawn game seems to lead us on to the next camp's tour and the possibility of more definitely establishing our superiority over Robertsbridge. We can only hope that we shall always have such an efficient and cheerful side : the remorseless consistency of Waghorn's bowling was amply reinforced by the opportune brilliance of Frank Morrell, Geoffrey Beard, and Walter Burley ; Frank Melling was undoubtedly our most dependable bat, but Walter Burley, Stan Reyner, and John Booth, apart from the happy way in which they clouted sixes and fours under ordinary circumstances, could always be relied on to pull us round in an emergency. The fielding was keen and surprisingly energetic, considering the gruel­ling conditions which we usually had to face, whilst the ferocity and resourcefulness of our " tail " when wagging (or lashing) with its back to the wall, had to be seen to be believed !

The juniors too had a number of cricket fixtures, and we all admired their repeated, if unavailing, efforts to defeat a strong Rye Grammar School side. During the first fortnight the juniors were also occupied with a number of excursions : they spent a day in Canterbury looking round the Cathedral (and other places of less ancient origin !), and another day bathing at Dungeness and inspect­ing the lighthouse, when one of the party devised the first Air Raid

Shelter Test by dropping a half-brick from the top of the tower. We were fortunate in having the Rye Carnival to visit this year, in addition to the perennial Winchelsea Flower Show. There were again some few hardy souls who walked into Hastings over the cliffs, and even one or two who limped back again after a day spent in attempting to ruin the owners of the Amusement Stalls and make the fortunes of the ice cream vendors. Fishing attracted a large number of the " rabble " this year, and many were the tricks and dodges employed to keep private any particularly promising new ground. " Stumps " was as popular and as lawless as ever, but it was sometimes difficult to explain to Mino just when, where, and why, he had to run after hitting the ball. For the fame of the camp has gone abroad : Mino himself is quite an old hand, but this year he had another French boy to keep him company ; and indeed it was only his peculiar aversion for spaghetti that made us doubt the Italian ancestry of Toni Morrelli !

Since this brief report is intended as much for those who have not yet been to camp as for those who have, we must not launch into a further string of more intimate and personal recollections which would have no meaning for those who had not taken part or " suffered " in them. But we cannot easily forget the night Gordon Joel was so fog-bound (or should we merely say fogged?) that he parked his car daintily but a little unwisely with three wheels on the bridge and a fourth dangling languidly over the moat ! Such was the penalty of disregarding his horoscope ! Nor the strange reserve of a certain fisherman who, after a very early rising and several hours intense application, returned with one crab to reward his pains. Nor yet the profundity of the slumbers of another man, who was not only totally unacquainted with such exigencies as early risings, but who required the concerted efforts of the whole camp if indeed he were to be roused for breakfast. Nor even . . . but there are very few things that we forget about Mr. Saville's camp-come and see !

G.D.B.

The War in China.

(The following article reached us in December last from Stanley Miles (K.E.S. 19 -19 ) Medical Officer on H.M.S. Gnat).

I REMEMBER well how when I took my School Certificate Examination I had the distinction, a far from creditable one, of being the only candidate to fail in Geography. I have lived to regret it. When, a little over two years ago, I was appointed to a Gunboat in China I found I knew nothing of that country. My ultimate destination was Hankow, so taking my atlas and a pair of dividers I discovered that Sheffield was 3,500 miles north of the equator and Hankow only 2,000. I didn't therefore take my winter clothes. When I arrived in Hankow in early January there was four feet of snow and a temperature below zero. I had forgotten that Hankow was 600 miles inland and that no Gulf Stream warmed China's coast.

It seemed too that I was not to be allowed to forget my first experience of China, for I was reminded of its unexpected coldness the following winter. My duties had taken me to Hong-Kong where owing to wartime transport difficulties I was delayed for three weeks. Most of this time I spent lazing and bathing in the island's delightful bays. Even though in December it was warmer than an English summer. After this unforeseen holiday I returned to Hankow in a German air-liner. Leaving the warm sunshine of Hong-Kong we flew northwards for five hours the last of which we were tossed about in a snow storm. It was bitter and un­pleasant and a hot drink by a roaring fire was most welcome.

My journey to Hong-Kong was itself an exciting one. The Japanese army was slowly advancing on Hankow ; air-raids were frequent. The British Embassy Staff decided to leave, and a special train was chartered. All British subjects in Hankow whose duty didn't keep them were advised to take advantage of this train and leave. We had seven sailors in hospital, two of whom had gone mad, and it was thought best to send them to Hong-Kong while transport was still available. I had the good fortune to be put in charge of this party as I had previously made the same journey in the Summer ; that was just before the war started. It was a three days journey and at first uneventful until we heard that the line ahead of us had been broken. We pushed on however until we came to the wrecked line where after a few hours delay we were able to proceed dead slow on an improvised track. The next day a telegram in code reached us warning us that the Japanese were expected to bomb Canton Station at eight o'clock the following morning precisely the time we were due to arrive there. As we were obliged to pass through Canton the only thing we could do was to increase our speed and by so doing we steamed through the danger zone at half-past six, later to learn that the raid had taken place at ten minutes to eight and the track damaged. (We knew from the start that the Japanese would do their best to delay the train). As we sped on our last lap we saw three bombers circling overhead. They dropped their bombs on the line just ahead of us but where we could not see them for the hilly wooded country nor hear for the noise of the train. There was no signalling system to warn us but fortunately the actual line we were on was not hit and we sped on between a series of steaming craters beside the track to reach our destination without further alarm.

They were thrilling times, the months during which the Japanese were advancing on Hankow. Rarely a week passed without one or two air-raids. At first the Chinese resistance was good and when the alarm sounded about two dozen fighting planes would leave the ground and either circle round the City or go off to meet the enemy. Sometimes the Japanese would be driven back, but often they broke through and we would see daring " dog-fighting " above us, the planes roaring and diving at each other with a rattle of machine guns. Occasionally one would come crashing down in a plume of smoke. If the defenders were out-numbered they would fly off knowing well that they could not be followed far as shortage of fuel would force their opponents to return to their distant base. Then the heavy bombers would come over and unload their unwelcome cargo whilst anti-aircraft guns barked at them from all angles, but never once was a plane brought down. We had great confidence in the Japanese marksmanship, for, whilst the bombs fell un­pleasantly near on few occasions, never once was damage done to the property of non-combatants. Twice we were subject to night raids which were even more spectacular. After the alarm there was complete darkness, then the drone of approaching planes, spurts of flame from machine-guns, searchlights sweeping the skies, red rockets like streaks of the " tracer bullets " from the anti-aircraft guns : finally the blinding flash and low shaking rumble of exploding bombs, then silence again. Always there were large flames from burning ruins and in the morning clouds of smoke from smouldering debris.

As time went on the Chinese resistance weakened, and finally Japanese planes dropped their bombs unhindered until there was nothing left worth bombing, and we were left in peace. But not for long, because the Japanese armies were approaching from the north and south and their fleet steaming up the river from the east.

We heard the distant rumble of heavy artillery a little nearer every day. We were more afraid of the retreating Chinese, who were burning everything as they fled, like the Russians in Moscow, and they wished to raze Hankow to the ground completely. The European and American property in Hankow forms a modern settlement on the water front. This we were determined to preserve, so gates were built across all the approaches, and with the aid of the French and Americans we landed armed parties of sailors and successfully kept out the retreating Chinese troops.

The night before the Japanese took the city our little area was surrounded by a belt of flame, like a great forest fire, with every now and then a shattering explosion as some building was demolished. Our men worked hard to prevent the spread of the fire and removed large quantities of dynamite from neighbouring buildings, the blowing up of which would threaten our safety.

We saw very little actual fighting ; only the mopping up of small remnants of the retreating troops. The entry of the Japanese into the city was very orderly and impressive, especially as the armies and the fleet arrived simultaneously. Since the occupation perfect order has been maintained, and although there is strict martial law with a six o'clock curfew there is also a pleasant feeling of security, and that another chapter has been written in the World's History Book.

The Visit of the Classical VIth to Cambridge,
March 4th - 5th, 1939.

CAMBRIDGE is situated in the heart of the Fen Country, a city of learning, of exquisite architecture and narrow streets, through whose centre the placid Cam flows on its way to the sea.

Thither on Saturday, March 4th, a day of cloud and intermittent drizzle, a party from the Classical VIth repaired by divers routes. Four of us with Mr. G. N. G. Smith, Mr. Thomas, Mr. Hunter, and Mr. Tappe, set off at 12.35 in two cars from School. Mr. Hunter was unfortunately taken ill at Intake and obliged to return. The two cars, one some distance ahead now, rattled and jogged steadily southwards down the Great North Road through Newark to Huntingdon, where they turned east to Cambridge, which was reached before 6 p.m. Meanwhile two of us journeyed thither by train, arriving in Cambridge just before eight.

We went direct from the station to the Arts Theatre, where, with the others, we watched a delightful performance of Sophocles' Antigone, in Greek, by an all-male cast who proved themselves competent actors. After the show we searched vainly under the inspiring leadership of Guite, H. F., for an establishment at which fried fish and chipped potatoes could be bought, and retired to our hotel, the " Cromwell " in Regent Street.

'Sunday dawned clear, sunny, and bright, although considerable rain had fallen during the night, and after a hearty breakfast the company sallied forth. After some wandering we reached the Cam as a practice-eight rowed past, and avoiding the attendant squadron of bicycles we sauntered along the towpath. Church-bells ringing out from across the river had an irresistible lure for Guite, and at the first available bridge he streaked for the church door and the morning service. The rest of us continued along the Cam out into rusticity through mud and fencing until Fen Ditton was reached -  a typical East Anglican village with a fine church - whence we returned by road, visiting an excellent tavern on the wayside to quench our thirst. We collected Mr. Smith, Mr. Tappe and Guite on King's Parade and in a nearby cafe partook of lunch. This proceeding lasted until 2 p.m.

In the afternoon we visited King's College Chapel an imposing pile of magnificent 15th century architecture and under the guidance of a jovial gentleman of the college we ascended the spiral staircase-an exercise guaranteed to produce cross-country winners in a week-on to the roof of lead sheeting, from which we could see Ely Cathedral sixteen miles away.

At 3 p.m. we gathered in the Market Square and all except Mayo and myself embarked in the automobiles for home. We who remained had an hour to spend, so, irresistibly drawn thither, we visited King's College Backs where grow those beautiful crocuses, and gazed down on the indolent Cam upon which several leisurely undergraduates were languidly punting or paddling. Wandering towards the station we reached the Fitzwilliam Museum and Art Gallery, but found only the Art Gallery open ; however, there were some fine old Dutch books and sundry examples of ancient glasswork.

We boarded the train for home at 4.22 p.m. and reached Sheffield at 8.48.

Those who returned otherwise first visited Ely and the Cathedral as well as an hotel where tea was taken. Uneventfully they reached Newark and repaired to some low dive for the consumption of fish and chips ; Mr. Thomas unfortunately got lost but was eventually found, and after a much delayed start the party reached Sheffield about midnight, very tired.

The general opinion was the expedition was a good thing, and that a vote of thanks should be given to Mr. Tappe for his capable organisation and to Mr. Thomas for his car.

W.H.B.

Play Competition.

THIS year we must thank Mr. Watling for organising a School Dramatic Competition. The school has in the past produced many plays and shown itself not to be lacking in histrionic ability. This year the test was more severe, for, apart from the general organisation, the plays were presented entirely by boys. They were chosen by boys, produced by boys, acted by boys, and stage-managed by boys. The result was that Mr. Watling was shown that he was not the only competent producer in the school.

The performances took place on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, March 9th, 10th and 11th-four Junior plays on Thursday, four Senior ones on Friday, and on Saturday the two best from each of the other nights.

The description of the plays must be approached from the point of view of the objective observer and not that of the dramatic critic, for the work of the latter was most ably done by three prominent figures in theatrical circles who kindly consented to come and adjudicate. Their criticisms were complete and searching. To add to them would be impossible ; to modify them presumptuous.

The four junior plays were The Dear Departed by 3B, The Forced Marriage by 3A, The Miracle on Watling Street by 2c, and Something to talk about by 4A.

Mrs. Ingold, whom we were fortunate enough to have to adjudi­cate the junior plays, after a careful criticism, decided that the two latter should be represented on Saturday. Of the Senior plays, which were adjudicated by Dr. David Ryalls, The Boy Comes Home by the Modern Studies and Classical Sixth, and Banquo's Chair by the Transitus, were chosen for the final on Saturday night. The Threat, by the Science Sixth, was unsuccessful largely because the play itself was not of the highest rank. Refund, the other unsuc­cessful play, failed, despite a very fine performance on the part of P. Rhodes as Wilkinson, because it was conceived as a farce and played at comedy speed.

On Saturday night the adjudicator was Mr. Geoffrey Ost, well-known as the producer at the Playhouse. He appeared pleased with all the plays and had a difficult task in selecting the best. The Miracle on Watling Street, and Something to Talk About both erred in the matter of grouping. The former was a more suitable play and therefore easier ; the latter, despite the reputation of Eden Phillpotts, was not a good play. " There is not a single good line in it," said Mr. Ost. It should have been played more quickly in order that the audience might not have time to consider its absurdity. E. K. Lodge as " The Wolf " gave a very creditable performance. Mr. Ost predicted great things for this young actor if he would take the trouble to learn his lines better. Something to Talk About proved popular with the audience, but Mr. Ost decided that The Miracle on Watling Street was the better performance, taking into account the relative ages and the team-work of the players.

a Banquo's Chair, was a " bogus " play, but Mr. Ost conceded that the players had got the required effect better than he had expected. The stage setting was very good ; it was, as the play required, a really " impossible " room. The noises off provided very satis­factory effects of the wind and rain of a dirty night. " Sir William Brent," " Robert Stone " and " John Gandy," were competent players. Brent's " pacing " was perhaps a little overdone, but nevertheless, effective. D. M. Nicol, as John Bedford, was also inclined to over-act his part. His terror was, however, really con­vincing. L. H. Truelove (who also produced), gave a good. perform­ance in the part of Lane, the butler. Mr. Ost said that he had never seen so realistic a Police Sergeant or Police Constable as J. K. Olivant id K. P. Stanley.

The Boy Comes Home is a play for two characters, Philip and Uncle James ; the other characters, all women, are incidental, but were well done considering the difficulties inherent in the portrayal of women by boys ; R. G. S. Ludlam as Philip, and K. E. Revill as Uncle James gave two of the most satisfying performances of the evening. Uncle James was fidgety and impatient as Uncle James should be ; Mr. Ost thought perhaps a little too fidgety and im­patient. Philip had the close attention of the audience throughout his long soliloquy, although in the dialogue he was accused of throw­ing his lines away. Mr. Ost, justifying his decision in favour of Banquo's Chair, said that though The Boy Comes Home was a much better play, and although Philip and Uncle James were unsurpassed as individual performances, Ban quo's Chair had required five actors, not two, and was a more consistent all-round production.

The experiment produced plays of a high quality. It is a pity the audiences were not larger.

H.C.R.

Book Club Blues.

ONE evening, feeling most downcast
And injured by the wiles of fate,
I ambled idly till I passed
A bookshop beckoning with a bait
Of bright new books : books green, and blue,
Books yellow, books of every hue
That you can think of. Here I ceased
My idle amblings, here the beast
In me departed, giving way
To intellect and taste outre.
On entering by transparent portals
I was assailed by demons three :
" Rise from your slumbers, 0 ye mortals ! "
Howls one, " and join the L.B.C. ! "
" Don't listen," whispers Two ; " propriety
Demands that with half the literate peerage
You join our heavenly Book Society,
For Victor Gollancz
A kick on the pants,
And a passage to Hell on the steerage."
" Save England now," whines Number Three,
" From Reds and Pacifists by signing
This entry form. The Right B.C.
Stops Moscow gold from undermining
With artful propaganda faith essential
For safe continuance of your preferential
Assured debentures." Now another
Arrived upon the scene.
" Lord Crewe,"
He squeaked, " doesn't wish to bother
You with all this, but please look through
These leaflets. The Liberals . . . " I could bear
Their sight no more, and turning tail
I fled to happier climes . . . Beware
Of demons with Book Clubs for sale !

H.E.S.

The Kid.

HE remembered it vividly. He was certain of it. He could see himself a few months ago - The Kid was sitting on a shelf of rock eating his dinner of bacon and beans when Spang ! The tin on the fire flew up in the air, the food went in all directions. The Kid sprang for his horse and pulled it behind a large boulder. His Colts leapt like magic into his fists, and as lead chipped bits of the rock he answered with occasional shots.

It was the Sheriff's posse who had been trailing him for days. The Kid was a crack shot but he contented himself with shooting off hats and making men keep in cover. The Sheriff's hat showed above a rock and The Kid took a snap shot at it. The hat went flying away. " You will be needing a new skull soon if you go on at that rate ! " laughed The Kid. A volley of bullets greeted this sally and The Kid took cover.

Suddenly a rifle cracked in the hills, and the bullet made a hole in his fur chaps. "Who th' hell ? "muttered The Kid, as he swung round. The rifle glinted again, but The Kid cocked his revolver and shot it away. A startled face looked out and The Kid saw it was Hank Jarret, the Sheriff's son. The Kid was trapped. He sent a volley of shots at the men below, and cautiously jumped on his horse and galloped off.

A few minutes later he was riding along a narrow path with a sheer cliff on one side and a terrific drop on the other. This was a path few men dared go along, but The Kid was one who did dare. Suddenly he tensed. Ahead a roar sounded. It was a mountain lion, disturbed by The Kid. He must go on. He thought speed might help, so he increased his mount's speed, and he felt more than saw the slash of the lion's claws and the hot breath on his cheek.

He continued on his way, and the afternoon found The Kid resuming his meal with satisfaction. A sound made him turn, and looking up he saw the Sheriff crawling along the ledge. The Kid put a bullet in his shoulder, and the Sheriff turned round and crawled back.

An hour later The Kid heard a shot. He looked down the path and saw Hank on horseback. They exchanged shots and then The Kid thought of the lion. He shouted, and suddenly the lion came out of its lair on the side of the cliff face, and Hank saw it.

The horse could not turn and then Hank thought what The Kid had thought-speed might get him through. He crammed on speed but the mountain lion crashed on him and all three went flying from the ledge. The Kid just had a glimpse of a dagger in Hank's hand, but the lion, rider, and horse plunged down the 500 foot drop.

The Kid carefully went down a slope with his horse and reached the bottom with only a few bruises. There lay the lion, smashed to pulp on the hard rock. The horse lay dead in the shallows, but Hank lay in the deep water. The depth had saved him. The Kid waded in and dragged him out. When Hank came to he was lying on a bed of pine needles. An intense pain occupied his right cheek, where the lion had torn it open. As he stirred, The Kid came over to him and Hank spoke faintly

" You've got me, outlaw, now shoot ! " The Kid stared and then shook his head,

" No, I am going to take you back. I guess the Sheriff and his men are chewing the fat about you in the bunk-house."

A week later The Kid took Hank back and just escaped capture. But now he was caught. Hank, his cheek now healed, was staring into the fire. The Kid, his body bound to a tree, watched Hank, who, after everybody was asleep, rubbed his seared face and sighed. He got up cautiously. Taking his knife from his belt he cut The Kid's bonds and said

" I'm turning in now. There's a horse in the bushes behind. I have not forgotten what you did for me a month or so back."

The Kid looked surprised but he stole away. In a moment the thunder of hooves woke up all the posse. Shot after shot flew after The Kid. He glanced down and found a rifle and his two Colts in the saddle.

THE END.

J.M.E. (3R).

Visit to an Armament Works.

Sighing cylinders push their pistons
wheels turning turning
day and day and night
pulleys rattle gears mesh
the steel on the lathe
turns like cheese
hot reek-ammonia
boss in his office
smoking big cigar
" this way, sir "
office boy adding accounts
smelting department smelts
100 tons ore a day
white glowing crucibles
100 tons a day
sulphur atmosphere stifling hot
and day and day and night
jump quickly or you're for it
blinding glare shut your eyes
" now the machine shop "
compensation act pays you
a faulty drill or lathe
too slow-finger lost
God it's hot. Speed up
500 shells a day-speed up 1
stick that bolt in its hole
each time it comes round
stick that bolt in its hole
each time it comes round
each time each time each time
each time it comes round
don't miss don't miss don't miss
" now sir, the administration …"

H.C.R.

Brave New World.

THERE was a time when Strawinski
TOr even our old friend Rimsky­
Korsakov caused a sensation.
But what is their relation
To the amorphous mass of " dying falls "
We hear now in our concert halls?

I like Debussy, although some fussy
Old pedants always refer me to Bach
And as for Strauss-I haven't a grouse
Although we're a bit in the dark
About " Juan's " " affaires d'amour "
And we're never quite sure
About " Till Eulenspiegel's " latest lark.

And even impressions obtained from sessions
Of Lambert, Walton, and Bliss
Are quite reassuring and sometimes alluring
To us brainless morons who miss
Beethoven, Brahms, and other such balms
From out of the " classic " abyss.

But what of the products of future time !
Will music have lost all reason and rhyme
Will concert programmes entirely consist
Of expressionist oeuvres and strongly resist
All bourgeois symptoms of rhythm and key?
Shall we hear an atonal symphony,

A shapeless sonata for three fish bones,
Or a dirge for microtonic saxophones
And will the early masters be
Represented by works of Kodaly,
Songs in French by Florent Schmitt
And string quartettes by Hindemith ?

H.C.R.

Football.

1ST XI.

We have had one of the most unsatisfactory seasons of the last few years. We started with a young and inexperienced side ; illness and injuries have taken a rather unfair toll of our older members, and playing conditions have generally been far from good.

After an unsuccessful Autumn Term, however, Buckley's efforts have begun to have their reward this term, when the standard of teamwork has become very high and the side has given some excellent performances. In fact, we may justly claim that the season's performances as a whole would have been vastly different, if we could have had a more settled side throughout the Autumn Term.

1ST XI CHARACTERS.

G. BAIN, G. W. SWIFT and J. D. MARLOW, goalkeepers.

Until his injury, Bain kept goal very well. His pluck and courage makes up for his lack of inches.

Swift, although playing in only a few matches before he unfor­tunately broke his arm, showed exceptional ability. Combines pluck with wonderful anticipation.

After Swift's injury, Marlow took over the goalkeeper's job very well. With little more anticipation he should make a good goalkeeper.

J. R. BROUGHTON, right-back.

Kept out of the side through illness until the latter part of the season ; since his inclusion in the side has given a welcome stiffening to the defence. Must remember that a defender's object is to get the ball away.

R. F. JEFFRIES, left-back.

Has steadily improved throughout the season into a useful full-back. Must learn to kick with his right foot and to watch his passes and clearances more closely.

†T. R. BUCKLEY, right-half and centre-forward.

As captain, has had a difficult task to do, and has done it well. Has made a poor side at the beginning of the season into a side able to hold its own against its strongest opponents. His play has always been an inspiration to the rest of the side. .

*M. PARKIN, centre-half.

One of the most improved members of the side. He has developed into a very solid defender. Must overcome his tendency to clear the ball anywhere or to kick into touch and remember to pass to an unmarked man.

†P. J. WHEATLEY, left-half.

One of our towers of strength ; has latterly had a tendency to concentrate rather too much on attack, though he has scored many very good and useful goals.

F. W. COLQUHOUN, right-wing.

An enthusiastic and hard-working wing forward who never gives in. Must learn to centre and pass more accurately. His ball control could be further improved.

*R. C. MOFFAT, inside-right.

A clever inside forward ; with a' little more sprightliness would be very good indeed. Has a good right foot shot which should certainly be used more often.

*K. C. HUTTON, centre-forward and right-half.

Has had a trying time at centre-forward for most of the season. Since moving to half-back his real football ability has been brought out.

†P. RHODES, inside-left.

A tower of strength in the forward line ; has been troubled by injuries throughout the season which have slowed him down considerably and kept him out of the side too often. Has been sadly missed by the other forwards in many matches. But we still know we can expect big things from him.

G. R. GILFILLAN, left-wing.

One of our cleverest footballers, who has always tried to play the best type of football. His play has a neatness unusual at his age. Should now try to concentrate on speed.

† Old Colours. * New Colours.

UNDER 14 FOOTBALL.

If I don't write some " Under 14 Football Notes," I shall get a thick ear from various people, so I will try to think of something to say.

Everyone has enjoyed the matches, and, with the exception of a complete massacre at Lincoln, the team have acquitted themselves well.

The best game was that against Nether Edge, which we lost 3-2. The lead against us kept the whole team on their toes right up to the end. We felt rather annoyed at losing after battering away at the Nether Edge goal most of the second half, but we had produced the best football of the season.

The following team represented us most of the season, except for occasional changes due to illness :­

Howard.
Jowitt. Powell.
Atty. Oliver. Lake.
Dronfield. Hind. Holmes(Capt.). Goodman. Wreghitt.

Holmes has been a very useful captain both on and off the field. We have owed many goals to his hard shooting, though his enthusiasm has occasionally taken him out of position.

Dronfield's speed and kick, and Wreghitt's neat footwork have been useful on the wings. Hind has worked hard, though often not in his right position. Goodman has shown promise for next year's team.

All three halves have done a lot of good work. The full-backs, though large and long-kicking, have tended to come too far up field and let opposing forwards race past them. In goal, Howard has been always cheerful and efficient, and occasionally brilliant.

Finally, a word of thanks to a few enthusiastic supporters who have encouraged us during the season. Indeed one game was practically won for us by Shaddock, who ruined his old school blazer diving through a hedge after the ball when we needed every second to get a deciding goal.

P. F. T.

HOUSE COMPETITIONS, 1938-39.

1st XI.

2ND XI.

         

Goals.

   
 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agst.

Pts.

Postn.

CLUMBER      ..

7

5

1

1

35

23

11

1

WELBECK

7

4

1

2

28

22

10

2

LYNWOOD

7

3

1

3

28

18

9

3

HADDON

7

3

1

3

36

24

9

4

ARUNDEL

7

4

3

0

59

23

8

5

WENTWORTH ..

7

3

3

1

39

27

7

6

SHERWOOD

7

1

6

0

8

55

2

7

CHATSWORTH ..

7

0'

7

0

11

52

0

8

         

Goals.

   
 

P:

W.

L.

D.

For

Agst.

Pts. Postn.

*ARUNDEL

7

5

1

1

33

16

11

1

LYNWOOD

7

5

1

1

32

13

11

1

HADDON

7

4

2

1

19

20

9

3

CHATSWORTH

7

3

2

2

24

21

8

4

WENTWORTH ..

7

3

4

0

34

26

6

5

CLUMBER

7

2

4

1

33

27

5

6

SHERWOOD

7

2

5

0

13

35

4

7

WELBECK

7

1

6

0

14

44

2

8

* Arundel beat Lynwood in the play-off, 5 goals to 0.  

3RD XI.                             

         

Goals.

   
 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agst.

Pts. Postn.

ARUNDEL

7

7

0

0

84

6

14

1

HADDON

7

6

1

0

69*

8

12

2

LYNWOOD

7

5

2

0

25

35

10

3

CLUMBER

7

4

3

0

22

26

8

4

SHERWOOD

7

2

4

1

39

38

5

5

CHATSWORTH ..

7

2

4

1

14

40*

5

6

WELBECK

7

1

6

0

4

60

2

7

WENTWORTH ..

7

0

7

0

13

57

0

8

*Plus infinity.
K.E.S. v. LYNWOOD OLD Boys.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Saturday, 10th December. Teams-School Bain ; Sargent, Jeffries ; Buckley, Parkin, Wheatley ; Colquhoun, Moffat, Hutton, Rhodes, Gilfillan. Lynwood : Saville ; West, Hemmingway ; Tomlinson, Burley, Graham ; Nornable, Brownhill, Pearson, Hearnshaw, Wales. Buckley won the toss and defended the Whiteley Wood Road end. This game was played on Pitch 2, owing to the unfit state of the 1st XI pitch. The School were passing better than usual, and Buckley gave them the lead with a long-distance shot which deceived Saville. A movement by the School's right-wing nearly resulted in another goal ; but five minutes only had elapsed when Nornable, whose speed and sudden cutting-in caused the School much anxiety, forced a corner. The ball eventually went to Pearson, who drove it home ; but Buckley, with a shot similar to his first, put the School once again ahead. Colquhoun increased this lead after a scrimmage in the goalmouth. Burley soon ran through and scored, however, and then Lynwood equalised. The School pressed hard before half-time, but could not regain the lead.

Half-time : 3-3.

Soon after half-time Nornable sped down the wing, and cut in to score a goal he had deserved all the time-he was easily the most skilful player on the field. Rhodes, however, equalised with a fine shot from 30 yards out, and although the School were awarded a penalty, the game finished in a draw, and semi-darkness.

Result : School 4, Lynwood 4.

K.E.S. v. FIRTH PARK.

Played at Firth Park on Saturday, 17th December. Team : Bain ; Sargent, Jeffries ; Buckley, Parkin, Wheatley ; Colquhoun, Moffat, Hutton, Rhodes, Gilfillan. The School won the toss and kicked down the slope. It was obvious from the start that the School defence would not be greatly troubled by the Firth Park forwards, who were exceptionally small and not strong enough for the heavy ground. The School attacked from the start and did everything but score ; it was impossible to play football down the middle, and there was not much room for the wingmen to work in owing to the small size of the ground. Eventually, however, Wheatley opened the scoring and Rhodes added a second a little later ; both took their chances very well and scored with good shots. Before the interval, however, Firth Park twice broke away on the left-wing and scored. These were about the only chances they ever had, for the School were attacking all the time, but could not shoot in the thick mud.

Half-time : School 2, Firth Park 2.

After the interval the School attacked at once and were soon a goal ahead. Buckley passed the ball down the centre and Wheatley ran through to score a very good goal. This run through of Wheatley's showed the School forwards how to play in the mud, and they responded immediately. Instead of trying to dribble, as the forwards had been doing in the first half, Wheatley's goal showed that the way to beat the man was to kick the ball well past him and then run on for it. The difference in the two styles of play is that the man is beaten without the ball, instead of with it. Just afterwards, Wheatley completed a well-deserved hat-trick with a goal similar to his second. The School kept the ball well on the top wing this half, and consequently ran through the Firth Park defence nearly every time. The triangle of Gilfillan, Rhodes and Wheatley on that wing played very well indeed. Rhodes scored a fifth goal with a good shot. Further goals were scored by Moffat (2) and Hutton (2), and Colquhoun was very unlucky not to score when he hit the post. The forwards played much better in the second half and worked together as a complete line held together by Hutton at centre-forward. The wing halves had practically no defending to do and were able to feed the forwards continually, so that the whole forward line was well up in attack. Parkin, Sargent and Jeffries in the defence, were very sound and easily held the opposing forwards when they did attack. Bain, in goal, was practi­cally a spectator during the game.

Result : School 9, Firth Park 2.

Scorers : Wheatley (3), Rhodes (2), Moffat (2), Hutton (2).

K.E.S. v. HUDDERSFIELD AMATEURS.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Saturday, 21st January. Team . Bain ; Sargent, Jeffries ; Broughton, Parkin, Buckley ; Colquhoun, Moffat, Hutton, Stamp, Gilfillan. This match was played on Pitch 2 the ground was very muddy and a mist made visibility poor. School lost the toss and defended the Whiteley Wood Road goal. In five minutes, Huddersfield had two goals, the first, from a shot just inside the post. They added three more before half-time, largely by clever passing and understanding, but the score did not altogether represent the true run of the play. All the goals were scored at close range, and none gave Bain a chance. He was playing very well, and showed judgment in coming out of his goal.

Half-time - School 0, Huddersfield 5.

Huddersfield scored immediately after the interval, but the School replied after a scrimmage in the goal. Now, however, encouraged by an enthusiastic supporter with a very sonorous horn on his car, the Huddersfield team dominated the match, and the ball was nearly always in the School's half. It would be unfair, however, not to mention Sargent and his sound tackling, but for which the situation might have been far worse than it actually was, and Barn's extremely plucky play in goal-there was only one goal with which one felt he had a chance.

Result : School 1, Huddersfield 13.

K.E.S. v. SHEFFIELD FALCONS.

Played at Meadowhead, Saturday, 4th February. Team : Swift ; Broughton, Jeffries ; Hutton, Parkin, Wheatley ; Colquhoun, Moffat, Buckley, Rhodes, Gilfillan. The School kicked off with a biting wind blowing across the pitch, and started very strongly. When, after half an hour, the Falcons had scored two goals, one felt it had been distinctly against the run of play. They added another just before half-time. The pitch had played some queer tricks with the ball, making it bounce very awkwardly.

Half-time : School 0, Falcons 3.

Immediately after half-time, Buckley, who had been playing very well and had been unlucky not to score before, reduced the School's arrears with a beautiful shot. But in quick breakaways, the Falcons added two more, and would have yet further increased their lead but for some splendid saves by Swift. The closing stages of the game, however, were very interesting. Moffat walked a centre from Gilfillan into the net, but the Falcons replied. Just before time, however, Gilfillan, who had done all the work for the last goal, scored with a well-timed header.

Result : School 3, Falcons 6.

The result was distinctly unfavourable to the School, who as a team, played better than they had done for some time.

K.E.S. v. CENTRAL SECONDARY SCHOOL.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Wednesday, 8th February. Team . Swift ; Broughton, Jeffries ; Wheatley, Parkin, Hutton ; Colquhoun, Moffat, Buckley, Rhodes, Gilfillan. We won the toss and attacked the brook goal. After some strong attacks by both sides, a movement between Gilfillan, Rhodes and Buckley resulted in Buckley opening the scoring ; very soon he added another from a centre from Wheatley. This stung the Central to attack very strongly ; Swift saved what looked a certain goal, but the Central forced a corner and scored from it. A breakaway by the inside-right put them on level terms. Buckley, who was playing very well, put the School ahead again, and he did the work for the next goal, which was tapped through by Colquhoun after the goalkeeper had been unable to hold the ball. The School were on top now : Buckley passed to Rhodes, who made no mistake with a powerful rising shot. The Central side attacked strongly, but Swift was equal to the occasion. Buckley added two more goals before half-time, when the score was­

School 7, Central 2.

After the interval play became more one-sided, but it was not until twenty minutes had elapsed that a goal came, Wheatley scoring from near the edge of the penalty area. This was immediately followed by a goal from Rhodes. Then the Central broke away and scored ; till the end of the game the School kept the Central team in their own half almost all the time. Wheatley and Buckley added further goals. The next scorer was Moffat, the ball miracu­lously just going the right side of the post. In spite of many fine saves by the Central goalkeeper, the School added two more before time.

Result : School 14, Central 3.

K.E.S. v. ACKWORTH.

Played at Ackworth, Wednesday, 15th February. Team : Marlow ; Broughton, Jeffries ; Corner, Parkin, Hutton ; Colquhoun, Moffat, Buckley, Wheatley, Gilfillan. Buckley won the toss, and although Ackworth appeared at first to be the more experienced team, it was not long before the School scored through Moffat, after Buckley had given a shrewd pass to Gilfillan. Colquhoun immediately added another. After about a quarter of an hour, Wheatley scored from a cross-shot. In spite of a fine save by Marlow, Ackworth scored one goal before half-time.

Half-time : School 3, Ackworth 1.

An Ackworth man rushed through immediately after the interval, but Marlow put the ball over the bar in fine style. But they began to press very strongly and equalised. However, they lost their skill in passing after this. With a fine free-kick, Buckley regained the lead, which was strengthened by Moffat with a fine header from a corner by Wheatley. The School were on top now, Buckley making some remarkable individual efforts. The School's score was completed by Moffat, who took the goalkeeper completely by surprise after a pass from Wheatley. Ackworth added another goal before time.

Result : School 6, Ackworth 4.

The defence had some anxious moments half way through the second half, but confident play by the forwards encouraged the team as a whole.

K.E.S. v. OLD EDWARDIANS.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Saturday, 18th February. Teams-School Marlow ; Broughton, Jeffries ; Corner, Parkin, Hutton ; Colquhoun, Moffat, Buckley, Wheatley, Williamson. O.E's. : Mortimer ; Sorby, Downing (F.) ; Sivil (E. W.), Hawkswell, Walton ; Sivil (G. B.), Sivil (V. R.), Gray (R.), Pearson, Gray (W. S.). We lost the toss and defended the brook goal. The Old Boys began to attack immediately and forced a corner on the right-wing, from which Gray (R.) scored ; soon after this he added another. The School retaliated, and from a free-kick taken by Buckley on the edge of the penalty area, Wheatley scored. The same player equalised a few minutes later with a shot into the roof of the net. Immediately after this Moffat put the School ahead ; but, from a pass by his brother, Gray (W. S.) drew Marlow and shot into an empty goal.

Half-time : School 3, O.E.'s 3.

Up to this point play had been fairly even, but in the second half the School lost their energy and were constantly on the defensive. V. R. Sivil scored with what seemed an almost impossible cross-shot ; then R. Gray, who had been temporarily injured, converted a perfect centre from E. W. Sivil, and then scored another goal. It was all O.E.'s now ; Pearson scored one off a School defender before time.

Result : School 3, O.E.'s 7. Scorers . Wheatley (2), Moffat .

VI SCIENTIFIC AND MATHEMATICAL v. VI CLASSICAL AND MODERN.

O fortunatam medio tibi Ludlame turbam,
Et cui praeses exit callidus ante Revill ;
cui columen rerum stat barbarus ille Rogerus
Arbiter et pugnae Tappe magister Brit.

Inspired by these noble verses and strengthened by the singing of its favourite hymns, a united force of modern and classical students confronted their scientific and mathematical counterparts on the 1st XI field at Whiteley Woods on the fifteenth day of February, 1939.

It was decided for tactical reasons to transfer the columen rerum to right half, but otherwise the teams lined up as had already been predestinated.

The scientists kicked off from the brook end in the presence of a large crowd of spectators, many of whom were subsequently moved to pass com­ments on the quality of the football. Revill was soon prominent with saves that would have done credit to an international, but in spite of his heroic efforts Hudson, most vocal of materialists, soon scored from point blank range. Undismayed by this early reverse our little band of poets and philosophers soon proceeded to make havoc of the scientific hordes. Clever work by the classical inside men placed the ball at Ludlam's feet when that worthy was standing unmarked some ten yards out of goal. In his eagerness, however, and as a result of the logical reasoning so strongly urged upon him by his favourite master, he attempted to kick the ball with both feet at once ; fortunately his injury was not serious, and he was able to continue. A little later, having first intimidated the opposing goalkeeper with a fearsome cry of victory, and resisting all scientific and mathematical attempts to dispossess him of the ball, he scored a truly magnificent and memorable goal ; a fitting answer to those ignorant and narrow-minded critics who had dared to cast doubt on his ability. If he did not further add to his own score it was only because he preferred, with that unselfish sportsmanship which is so character­istic of the man, to make openings for his fellow forwards rather than to increase his own already glorious reputation as a goal-scoring centreforward.

Guite, H. F., that veteran scholhunter and champion of lost causes, sparkled on the right wing with a rather circuitous dribble, in the course of which he beat three of his own men before finally transferring the leather to the unerring feet of the indefatigable Barnes, whence it proceeded by easy stages to the experienced instep of that incipient genius, Leslie Fletcher, and so past the bewildered scientific custodian, elsewhere renowned as a redoubt­able upholder of Victorian morality. A little later our amorous Harold, on the very point of scoring, was felled to the ground by linguist Hipkins (who had magnanimously consented to deputise for a defaulting scientist, or was it a mathematician ?) but soon had the consolation of crowning a glorious solo run with an equally glorious goal.

The left wing, too, was conspicuous with some brilliant runs, and the irrepressible Joshua had no small part in the further goals that accrued to Leslie's boot. Thus, in spite of some valiant work by skipper Bennett and some fierce tackling by Halle, that prince of dogmatists, at half-time the scientists and mathematicians were losing by 4 goals to 1 (approx.).

It was not until the second half that the columen rerum, resplendent in his newly-acquired School Colours, began to show his mettle and to justify his inclusion in the team. But once he had loosened up he was obviously one of the finest players on the field. His fearless tackling, his pertinacity, his positioning, his ball-control, and his long accurate passes to the right wing all stamped him as a class player and a master of his art.

With the transference of play to the Whiteley Wood Road end, the spectators began to take an active part in the game. The players as a whole and the classical centreforward in particular maintained a lofty indifference to their adverse and unconsidered comments, but Mr. Tappe, that good shepherd of all lost classical lambs, looking every inch a referee in his Tyrolean musical comedy shorts, was at first inclined to be overawed by their un­animity, but later asserted his authority in no uncertain manner, almost becoming angry when the mob tried to convert what he considered a scientific goalkick into a classical corner.

A few scientific and mathematical breakaways occurred, but in spite of treacherous touchline work by Helmut and George, Revill's safe hands were equal even to that aerobatic shot which dropped upon him from the clouds. For the most part the rest of the game consisted of modern and classical attacks, firmly bolstered up by Peter Upton, that loquacious forerunner of the brave new world, and generally consummated by the wiles of Leslie Fletcher. Richard, of course, was prominent with several clever dribbles and a powerful shot which crashed against the bar with the goalkeeper hopelessly beaten ; but having been rudely grassed by Bennett, he felt himself obliged to reciprocate the compliment, and but for the softness of the ground might well be serving a life-sentence for manslaughter. Owing to the inefficiency of the referee, the final score is still in doubt, but the writer of this report estimates it at 8 goals to one.

Complaints against Mr. Tappe's conduct were subsequently lodged with the authorities by both teams, but I am glad to say that at the enquiry he was triumphantly vindicated, and has since been promoted to the list of three-star referees.

I have it on good authority that the centreforward, columen rerum, and goalkeeper of the classical and modern side were approached in the dressing room by Arsenal scouts and offered lucrative contracts. The first immediately produced certificates to prove that he was medically unfit to play football, the second declared that no pecuniary temptation could ever undermine his loyalty to his House and to his School, whilst the third would not consider any course of action which involved a severance of the bonds of affection which bound him so closely to his tutors.

H.F.G.

Cross-Country, 1939.

T HE Senior School Cross-Country races were again run in beautiful weather. There was some wind, but the sun was shining, and it was a warm Spring day-a perfect day for cross-country. The going was not very heavy, but it was very slippery, especially over the school field.

In the Under-14 race the first two men were so well ahead that they almost reached home before the Seniors had set off. Their time was about 202 minutes, and both of them, Collins, W. H. and Poole, E. A., were in the same house, Haddon. By all accounts the first half-dozen men in this race established their positions quite early on, and held doggedly to them throughout. All credit is due to them.

In the Senior race, again, the first two men, both from the same house, Clumber this time, were well away from the rest of the field at the finish. Last year's winner, L. M. Wade, took the lead from the start. G. H. Parsons, who was fourth last year, did not assert himself so soon, but was always within striking distance of Wade. His final attack began almost within sight of the finish, and the assembled multitude at Whiteley Woods was treated to a really fine race across the last slippery furlong of the course. Parsons had the psychological advantage over this last stretch, and just won, " on the post," a race in which both ran very creditably. The time was approximately 29 minutes. The next two men had a similar race for third place, and Townsend only overtook Slater very near the end.

The team-races resulted in a repetition by Arundel of their double win in 1938. Curiously enough, the order of the next four houses was the same in both Senior and Under-14 races. Arundel deserves hearty congratulations on its team-work.

The results were as follows :­

Senior House Team Race.            

       

points

1.

Parsons, G. H.

(Clumber)

1. Arundel..

86

2.

Wade, L. M.

(Clumber)

2. Haddon ..

94

3.

Townsend, R. V.

(Haddon)

3. Clumber..

. 100

4.

Slater, W. D.

(Arundel)

4. Lynwood

119

5.

Buckley, T. R.

(Wentworth)

5. Wentworth

158

6.

Johnson, P. L.

(Sherwood)

6. Chatsworth

270

7.

Dodge, K. S.

(Welbeck)

7. Sherwood

283

8.

Oliver, J. G.

(Lynwood)

Welbeck -

team incomplete

 

(Arundel Team-4, Slater, W.D.; 9, Wheatley, P. J., 14, Edwards, J. ; 15, Bywaters, K. R. ; 20, Hall, E. S. ; 24, Harrison, J. G.).

Under-14 House Team Race.                

1. Collins, W. H.

(Haddon)

1. Arundel..

61

2. Poole, E. A.

(Haddon)

2. Haddon ..

88

3. Jones, T. K.

(Arundel)

3. Clumber

150

4. Barrett, G. E.

(Clumber)

4. Lynwood

155

5. Burgan, J. G.

(Arundel)

5. Wentworth

183

6. Campailla, F. D. N.

(Lynwood)

6. Welbeck..

198

7. Wreghitt, K. M. B.

(Arundel)

7. Sherwood

226

8. Perry, P. R.

(Wentworth)

8. Chatsworth

227

 

(Arundel Team-3, Jones, T. K.; 5, Burgan, J.G. ; 7, Wreghitt, K.M.B. ; 11, Harrison, C. D. ; 16, Wilson, M. B. ; 19, Catton, M.R.)

Junior School.

FOOTBALL.

THE history of our Football in January and  February must always read like a weather report ; and as everyone knows how.' seasonable' these months were this year, it is not surprising that there is little to tell.

Our first fixture with Westbourne had to be abandoned ; but the second one was played. The 1st XI must have played better than last term, for they were defeated this time by four goals to one ; while the 2nd XI, playing away, again gave a stout display. They drew 1-1, after having all the play ; if they had shown as much skill as determination they must have won handsomely.

One need hardly add that the House Competition has not been completed ; but in the 1st XI's there is no doubt that the Osborn team is too strong for any others, while the Saxon 2nd XI seems to be just as superior in the junior Division.

 

1ST X1.

       
 

P.

W.

D.

L.

Points.

OSBORN

4

4

0

0

8

SAXONS

5

3

1

1

7

ANGLES

5

2

2

1

6

NORMANS..

5

1

0

4

2

BRITONS

5

0

1

4

1

 

2ND XI.

       
 

P.

W.

D.

L.

Points.

SAXONS

4

4

0

0

8

BRITONS

4

2

1

1

5

NORMANS..

5

2

0

3

4

OSBORN

3

1

0

2

2

ANGLES

4

0

1

3

1

CROSS-COUNTRY.

We had a very big field for the run this year and an interesting struggle resulted. The afternoon was dull and the going heavy, so much that one competitor lost a shoe in the mud ; and nobody expected a fast time. But it was generally anticipated that Reeve, who won easily last year, would score again for the Saxons ; and we watched the hill eagerly for a pale blue shirt. First in sight was a Saxon, but we soon saw that it was Cockshott, G., who ran a very fine race and won by several yards from Wreghitt, P. H.

Though they had, as last year, the first man home, Saxons could do no better than take second place to Angles, who seem to have a gift for ` packing ' their team. Britons were third, Normans fourth and Osborn fifth.

The Library.

W E are glad to note that the number of books borrowed from the Main School Library has increased this term, but the demand for books from the subject branches has not shown much improvement. Once again we should like to invite boys to make greater use of them.

The fiction section has been particularly popular, but as lack of funds unfortunately prevents us from making many additions to it, we should be glad to receive gifts of books-boys' adventure stories, detective novels, or " classics."

There are still a few who do not know that they can borrow more than one book at a time ; we invite them, and all others who at present do not make much use of the library, to come and borrow many more next term. The librarians will give all the assistance they can.

G.S.H.

The Chess Club.

"HAVE a cigar," says A. "Why," asks B, "what's wrong with it ? " Thus is suspicion aroused at the mere idea of " something for nothing." Were there a subscription to the Chess Club it is very probable that there would be a large and vigorous membership.

In September a pleasing number of players gave in their names and a promising start was made, but before long the number had fallen considerably. Nevertheless those that remained have carried on valiantly.

An American tournament, in which fifteen took part, was not completed through lack of time. The highest score was gained by Langley C. (Trans.) who is to be congratulated. An end-game solving competition finds Beech, E. W. (Tr.) and Gill, G. E. (2A), tying for first place. Several beginners have learnt something about Chess.

So finishes another season in which it was possible for some to forget for a while the strain of schoolwork, and abandon themselves to this interesting, and often jolly, occupation.

The Orchestra.

THIS term the Orchestra has been augmented by a trombone, an instrument which we have been without for several years We welcome N.C. Jones, who has filled this gap.

We are now hard at work in preparation for the Festival at Queen's Hall on June 10th. The set pieces are the vivacious finale of Haydn's London Symphony, and the Minuet and Rondo from Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik (for strings). The Trio of the Minuet is being found a valuable lesson in the refinements of string playing. The difficulties of tackling a symphonic movement have been greatly lightened with the recent great increase in our wood­wind and brass sections. Fortunately the test-pieces are well-known to most of us.

We are also occupied with England, Parry's setting of the famous speech from Richard II, to be sung with the School on Speech Day, and Holst's Marching Song, which is very popular with everybody, because every section has some solo passages. Even that much-neglected instrument the Viola is given plenty of " fat."

Mr. Baylis is always ready to see all those desirous of taking up an instrument : at the moment there is an especial need for wood-wind.

The Tuesday Club.

ALTHOUGH previously rather restricted in activity, the Tuesday Club has blossomed into full flower this term. Two good stories were read earlier in the term : The Tomato Crimes, written by Fenton F., and The Missing Lamp-post Mystery, by Hiller, N. R., the latter of which Mr. Petter declared to be the best comedy written by a Tuesday Club member.

A discussion on Spiritualism was very popular and was attended by that eminent authority on the subject, Mr. Helliwell. Both he and Mr. Petter described their spiritualistic experiences. Actual photographs of spirits were produced by Dronfield, R., and at the close of the meeting the " spiritualists " were in the majority.

A Social was held on Tuesday, February 21st, which was a great success, and included in this was an admirable treasure hunt, organised by Hiller, N. R., and later games in the gym. under the supervision of Mr. Titchmarsh.

Although our membership this term has greatly increased, we are looking forward to more members from 4B next term.

J.D.E.
D.W.W.

Old Edwardians.

Old Edwardians' Football Club.

Season 1938-9.

THIS season we had, I think, the greatest influx of new members the Club has ever known, and now we have 34 playing members.

Unfortunately we have not been quite as successful on the field as we had hoped. The Club's records up to and including Saturday, 11th March, 1939, are as follows :­

Goals.

P.

W.

D.

L.

For

Agst.

1st XI

22

13

2

7

92

63

2nd XI

21

7

0

14

66

91

We decided at the beginning of the season that, rather than form two strong teams, we should aim to give each member an equal number of games without considering too seriously his ability as a footballer. This regular changing of the personnel of the teams has produced some very enjoyable games, but has also resulted in some degree of inconsistency.

We had to find a new ground this season and after much difficulty secured one at Dore Moor.

We are hoping that within a season or two we shall have sufficient funds to buy some land on which to build our own pavilion and provide facilities for visitors which we do not now possess. To raise this money we are holding at least two dances each season, and our next is on Thursday, 30th March, 1939, at Brincliffe Tennis Pavilion, Psalter Lane, and we should welcome any member of the Staff or Upper School. Tickets 4/6 inclusive.

We hope that any boy interested in football leaving School this year will communicate with the Secretary, E. W. Sivil, 39, Canterbury Avenue, Sheffield, 10. ('Phone 31015).

We are hoping soon to run three teams instead of two, and this is quite impossible without a good membership. We do not want anyone to think that just because they have not obtained School colours they will not be wanted. We have many players doing quite well who never had any expectations of being in the School XIs.

Oxford Letter.

Magdalen College, Oxford.

To the Editor of the School Magazine.

Some men, Sir, are born great, some achieve greatness, and I have had this letter thrust upon me. I must confess that I accepted this honourable though arduous duty rather lightly. Here, I thought, is a magnificent opportunity for touching off a few fine works at the expense of the O.E.'s up at Oxford whom I dislike, but I found, alas, that all my squibs were damp. For, as one of my predecessors once remarked, " I am a plain man," and it is not for me to display the splenetic vituperations and vitriolic icono­clasms that seem to be the hall-mark of an efficient Oxford letter.

I could not even attain to a world shattering opening sentence, and have had to snivel and snuffle my way into the heart of my sober catalogue. A mere catalogue it must be. I should not have either the space or the inclination to publish even a short biography of leading O.E.'s up at Oxford, were I in fact allowed to, for the last thing to do in an Oxford letter is to tell the truth.

Mr Carom, to take the veterans first, and the intervals of refuting the childish misconceptions of every other reputable mathematician, is to be seen ambling gently down the High with his head among the stars. The Merton clique of Nagle, Green and Beard appears to work hard ; Nagle for Greats and the Seventh Club ; Beard in a rapture of scientific enthusiasm, while Jack Green divides his attention between Anatomy and Arthur Askey.

Now for the odd individuals. Goldsbrough is never to be seen, and if Tom Crookes finds in the Labour Club an inadequate outlet for his political inspiration, he has certainly learnt to gyrate con­vincingly round the dance floor. Larder's capacity for rowing is threatening to surpass even his chicanery at Contract. Blake's life-work is finished : he has at last triumphed over the Committee and the Union has now that glory of civilisation, a ping-pong table. Bolsover, in the time left to him after cycling to and from his digs near Banbury, works at Anatomy " like a stooge," and gazes raptly at strangely seductive streptococci. His bedside manner is earning him great applause.

Of the Balliol trio, Maude is the most amusing, unconsciously so ; Walter Burley the most languid and the most mysterious, and John Gadsby the most conscientious. Maude has had an unfortunate term. He lost yet another bet with Larder, this time on the rowing of Pembroke and Balliol in Torpids, and Dr. Lindsay had him sconced for misogynist outbursts. Walter Burley, when he's to be seen at all, displays the most sensitive and studied indifference, and John Gadsby, if he hasn't got another cold, labours in a dingy and dangerous subterranean laboratory.

It seems impossible to leave the Queen's contingent out of the picture for long. Sachse has discovered that the path to Fascist manhood no longer lies through the O.T.C., and has bought his way out of it's morale-destroying camp life. Chare's accent is responding beautifully to intensive treatment. And Thornhill, arty rather than artistic, claims to fathom the aesthetics of a negative yet actual and sensible infinity. Chesham still hopes to become a Gauleite, and makes rancid speeches in a state of well-fed superiority to the manly applause of a trio of pap-fed, pseudo-intellectual Fascists. The Fascist trio nominated each other for the Union Committee, and leader Chesham polled less than ten votes. The only quality that distinguishes his ancillaries appears to be their taciturnity.

But to return to Magdalen and sanity. Marsh, although his billiards is improving, has been considerably upset by a new book on economics. He fears he may have to rewrite all his essays. With his aid, Simon sometimes helps to keep me from the very verge of starvation,

And as for myself, well,
I remain
Yours sincerely,
JOHN WILLIAMS.

House Notes.

ARUNDEL­

We have so far had a very successful term. The 3rd XI has simply romped home, winning their League, having played and won seven matches, and scoring 84 goals to 7. The 2nd XI, although not so over­whelming, won their Cup decisively, beating Lynwood in the play-off by 5 goals to 1. The 1st XI ended up a modest fifth, but had the satisfaction of beating Clumber, the cup winners, by 7 goals to 2.

The greatest satisfaction is caused by the results of the Cross Country. The juniors again won, scoring only 61 points, and the Seniors, after much deliberation, were placed first with 86 points. To carry off the double event for two years in succession is quite unprecedented. What is even more pleasing, however, is that if, in the junior event, numbers seven to twelve of our runners were counted they would be placed fourth. We are looking forward to continuing our success on Sports Day, with our useful lead of 80 points, and have already got into the finals of both the Tugs of War. Great credit is due to the younger members of the House.

CHATSWORTH­

The results in Football and in the Cross Country race this term have been rather disappointing ; all our Football XI's ended lower in the table than seemed likely at the end of last term. Much of the talent among the younger members of the House needs another season to develop, and then perhaps we may hope for better things. We have unfortunately been hard hit by absences this term, which have proved disastrous owing to lack of reserves.

Next term there will be the Swimming Sports, and we hope that the House will again have a high percentage of swimmers. Anyone who would like to play water-polo should see Howarth as soon as possible next term.

HADDON­

We have not been particularly successful in the Football Competitions this season, the 1st XI being unable to finish higher than fourth. The final positions of the 2nd and 3rd XIs' were third and second respectively, and their skill and enthusiasm is a good sign for future Haddon teams.

The two Cross Country Races took place on Wednesday, 1st March. Our performance in the Open Event was much better than last year, and we were finally placed second. Hearty congratulations are due to Townsend R. V., who on his first attempt in the Open, came in third. The Under 14 team was also placed second, and Collins, W. H. and Poole, E. A., are to be congratulated on being first and second respectively.

Finally, we wish the best of luck to all competitors in the Athletic Sports, and hope that all boys will practise in the holidays for the Swimming Sports. Particularly we would like boys to practise water-polo in preparation for the coming competition.

LYNWOOD

The House Football XI's have been fairly successful this season, finishing third, second and third respectively. The 2nd XI, though leaders on goal-average, were beaten decisively in a play off against Arundel.

After some regrettable difficulty in raising an Over 14 team, we achieved a not ignominious result in the Cross Country Run, both teams finishing fourth. Congratulations to Campailla on being sixth in the junior. Race and to Oliver, J. G., on gaining his Running Colours.

There is no reason why the House should not once again carry off the Sports Trophy, if everyone trains hard and gains points for standard time. Mr. Bradley will be glad to advise and assist boys in their training. All boys anxious to participate in Swimming and Polo activities should see Corner, J. E. D., the Swimming Captain as soon as possible. Boys are urged to train for the Swimming Sports and Polo Competitions next term. Practice will also be necessary for a satisfactory result in the Cricket Competitions, and it is hoped that more people than usual will be seen at the House Nets this year.

WELBECK­

This term sees the end of the Football Competitions for 1938-39. Our first team, although not composed of stars, put up a very good perform­ance, being unbeaten until the last match. In this we required only a draw to win the Cup, but our team went to pieces on a sticky ground, and was well beaten. The 2nd and 3rd XI's have unfortunately not done at all well.

Our efforts in the Cross Country were poor, but we are hoping for better results in the Sports. There was a keen demand for a House Social, and this was thoroughly enjoyed by those who were able to attend.

We wish Blaskey, who unfortunately had to leave during the term, every success in his new sphere. His going has left us without a Fives Captain, but anyone who wishes to learn the game should apply to Mr. Cumming.

WENTWORTH­

This term we say goodbye to our Housemaster, Mr. Hunter, who is leaving us after many years of excellent work both for the House and the School. I am sure all the House will join me in offering him our very best wishes for the future.

After a very promising start to the Football season the House 1st XI suddenly faded out this term, due to its failure to unite together as a team. Far too much was left for Buckley and Parkin to do, and I am sure that most of the other members of the team were not trying their hardest. However, this is not only noticed in Wentworth, but also in Football throughout the School.

Next term our biggest ambition is to win the Swimming Trophy. Last year we were second and only Gebhard of the team has left. With Parkin, Foggitt G. H., Foggitt R. H., Swycher, Leeson R. G. and Linsley, our chances seem quite bright, but I want everyone in the House to do his share to help, and not to leave everything to those higher up in the School.

Notices.

Contributions for THE MAGAZINE should be addressed to THE EDITOR, SCHOOL MAGAZINE, K.E.S. A box will also be found in the School Library into which all communications may be put.

All Contributions should be written clearly in ink, on one side of the paper only, with an ample margin on the left-hand side. It is a convenience if the number of words in an article be stated at the top of the first page.

The Editor will be glad to be kept informed of the doings of O.E's - especially those in distant parts of the world-in order that THE MAGAZINE may form a link between them and the School.

THE MAGAZINE can be supplied to any other than present members of the School at 6d. per copy, or for a subscription of 1/6 a year, post free.

OLD EDWARDIANS' ASSOCIATION. - Hon. Secretary, G. A. BOLSOVER, 70, Queen Street, Sheffield.

O.E. FOOTBALL CLUB.-All boys leaving School who wish to join should communicate with the Hon. Secretary, E. W. Sivil, 39, Canterbury Avenue. Sheffield, 10.

O.E. CRICKET CLUB.-Hon. Secretary, R. G. BEARD, 45, Bank Street, Sheffield, 1.