KING EDWARD VII SCHOOL MAGAZINE

VOL. XII
MARCH, 1948
No. 5

 

CONTENTS

OBITUARY 97 SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 112
SCHOOL CHAPEL 97 LOAN OF PICTURES 112
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 98 STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT 113
MISS J. W. M. COPLEY 98 CINE CLUB. 113
THE SCHOOL CONCERT 98 THE LIBRARY 114
"JOURNEY'S END" 99 CHESS CLUB 115
LOOKING BACKWARD 103 WAR MEMORIAL FUND 115
A WESLEY COLLEGE SOUVENIR 108 DAWN 115
REVEILLE 108 FOOTBALL 116
ON RETURNING TO SCHOOL IN THE AFTERNOON 109 HOUSE NOTES 118
THE POCKET MONEY PROBLEM 110 HOUSE LEAGUE COMPETITIONS 119
MUSIC 110 CROSSWORD 120
INTERNATIONAL DISCUSSION GROUP 111 NOTICES 120

 
Obituary

An Old Boy of Wesley College, Dr. C. C. HURST, ScD., Ph.D., T.D., who died on December 17th at the age of 77, was one of the pioneers of the science of genetics and an authority on the hybridization of orchids. At the beginning of the present century, Mendel's work on heredity was rediscovered and Dr. Hurst, working with Bateson and his band of followers at Cambridge, confirmed the Mendelian principles.- On his own experimental station at Burbage in Leicestershire, and later at Trinity College, Cambridge, he did important work on animal and plant genetics. He served in the Army in the 1914-18 war and, in his seventieth year, in the Royal Observer Corps.

* * * *

The School has lost a valued friend and supporter in the late Councillor F. H. PRICE, who died on December 13th, aged 61 years. From about 1927, when his son was in the Junior School, he had taken a close interest in the welfare of the School, first from the parent's angle, being an active leader in parents' committees -(and at least on one occasion, a parents' cricket team), and later as a Councillor and member of the Governing Body of the School. We extend our sympathy to his widow and family in their loss.

* * * *

Mr. J. H. DONCASTER, who died on January 16th, aged 74 years, was a member of the Education Committee, Chairman of the Secondary Schools Sectional Sub-Committee, and for many years a member of the Governing Body of the School, in which he invariably took the liveliest interest. He was a keen rock-climber and fisherman, and a great lover of the country. He retained his interest in the School right to the end of his life, and we are grateful to him for all that he did for us; we extend our sympathy to his widow in her grievous loss.

School Chapel

THE service this term was held in the School on Sunday, January 18th. There were many parents and friends present, and the sermon was delivered by the Rev. H. J. L. Gorse, a master at Harrow School. It consisted of an explanation of the meaning of the word "Love" in the New Testament. Two words in the Greek, agape and philia, are translated either by the word "love " or, as the Head Prefect reminded us before reading the lesson, by "charity" in its Elizabethan sense. Agape and philia are very different. Philia is love such as one has for friends. Agape is the feeling which impels one to do good to one's fellows. For example, if someone we dislike, for whom we have no philia, drops his books, we may be tempted to distribute them still further; if, however, we help him to pick them up, we are showing agape from which philia may later grow. The sermon clarified one of the central points of the Christian religion and no greater compliment can be bestowed upon the skill with which this was done than that paid by those who commented with approval on its brevity. T.E.K.

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS

The increased size and improved appearance of the Magazine since 1946, in addition to the rising costs of production, make it necessary to increase the price to external subscribers, who will in future be asked to pay three shillings a year. or one shilling per copy, post free. The cost price per copy naturally varies in proportion to the number distributed, but it is only with the help of a large number of subscribers that we can hope to maintain a Magazine of the present size and style. We hope that all boys leaving School will subscribe, which they can do either through the Old Edwardians Association or through the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. Watling. at the School.

Miss J. W. M. Copley

IT is thirty years since Miss Copley joined the staff of the Junior School. and during these years many hundreds of Edwardians have passed through her capable hands. To most of them she was one of the first of the Staff to be encountered on their first day in these new and often terrifying surroundings; and many must have been grateful for her kindliness and sympathy during their entrance examination. She had, in remarkable measure, an understanding of the difficulties of little boys, while still maintaining a firmness of discipline and an insistence on the highest standard of work of which she felt her pupils to be capable. These principles she embodied, too, in her own work; everything she did was marked with the same devotion and thoroughness; with her brisk and businesslike good humour, she tackled such jobs as refereeing football matches in mud and rain or encouraging the Normans to greater efforts in Athletics. In the production of Junior School plays she was a tower of strength.

Now has come the time for her retirement, and she goes, taking with her the gratitude and affection of all who have known her. May her years of rest be many: for one of her gay and courageous temperament they cannot fail to be happy.

The School Concert

(By a Visitor)

T HE members of the large audience assembled in the School Hall on December 6th were fortunate. They heard performances of music chosen with impeccable taste and judgment by the School's Director of Music. Mr. N. J. Barnes. The boys and masters who sang and played were more fortunate: it was plain that they had all enjoyed in rehearsals their growing intimacy with the works they performed, and with a happy zeal they set about the task of sharing their pleasure with their hearers.

It would be futile and unreasonable to expect artistic perfection in a school concert. Boys have the right to be " not grown up," but it is good for them to live with music of the highest order, the power and inner spirit of which will become more intense and lovable as their minds mature. It is better for them to rehearse and to perform. even without complete adequacy, music intrinsically sound and good, than to achieve technical perfection in the performance of ephemeral stuff which makes no demands on thought and feeling.

The orchestra stood up nobly to its task. Brass instruments are incorrigible but they can be more than a little disturbing when they assert their sturdy independence of pitch. A euphonium is not always euphonious but I feel sure Bach and Mozart would have been happy to know their works had called for such laudable effort which someday will bring the reward of accomplishment.

The unison songs and carols were sung with a refreshing zest, and a sensitiveness to rhythm and tonal values which betokened sound training and intelligent response. A setting of " The Lake Isle of Innisfree " by Mr. Barnes calls for a further hearing. The music is in every sense fitting and delicately expressive of the lovely poem. Mr. Barnes's powers as a composer were also manifest in his musicianly arrangement as Male Voice Trios of "Sing we and Chaunt it" (R. L. Pearsall), " Golden Slumbers " and " The Lass with the Delicate Air" (Arne) and in " A Garland of Carols for three Descant Recorders." The choir excelled in the lovely Part-Songs Diaphenia (C. V. Stanford) and " Why do the Roses Whisper to the Wind " (Pearsall). There was a balance of parts seldom achieved by a school choir. This choir should be encouraged to go on to sing the best and loveliest of such music with no fear of technical limitation.

It was good to hear Verracini's Sonata in A Minor played by Mr. Moore and his able accompanist I. M. Flowers, who also played very acceptably Mendelssohn's Scherzo in E Minor. B. A. Geeson and P. J. Landin are very promising young pianists. They played with precision and insight Four Polonaises for Piano Duet by Schubert. Handel's Sonata in F for Flute Solo is a lovely work. D. G. Armytage, accompanied by B. A. Geeson, played it admirably.

The singing of " Hark! the Herald Angels Sing " by the audience brought an enjoyable concert to a fitting conclusion. R.R.K.

"Journey's End "

MR. WATLING and the Dramatic Society have pulled it off again. Last year the news that they intended to produce The Apple Cart was received with foreboding by many people, who in the upshot were completely captivated by the performance of Kendrick and the rest. With even greater foreboding did we hear this year of the projected Journey's End. Those who had seen the original production could not believe that the play, which in 1928, with Laurence Olivier and Robert Speaight seemed so poignant, could be effective if performed by amateurs in 1948. And what was the outcome? I for one was as shattered as ever by the impact. Journey's End makes a direct attack on the nerves and heartstrings. For that very reason this production's "Greek tragedy ending" with Stanhope leaving the dead Raleigh at peace as he goes out to face the great attack (an ending made necessary by conditions of the stage at King Edward's) is less effective than the final collapse of the dug-out amid a crescendo of noise and darkness.

Stanhope must dominate the play, and in this C. B. Dawson was completely successful. He conveyed extremely well the impression of a leader whose concealed sensitivity is strained beyond endurance.

The intolerable scene with Raleigh after Osborne's death was as agonising as ever. But if Stanhope is the dominating figure, Osborne is quite as important. The attack on our nerves comes chiefly from Stanhope, the touch on our heartstrings from Osborne. Here was indeed the utterly reliable second-in-command, the middle-aged schoolmaster, the confidant. I. M. Flowers was well cast, but there was more to his performance than natural suitability. There were some most pleasingly subtle touches, as in his reading aloud of Raleigh's letter, and again when in some of his reassuring jokes he showed the haunted look behind the smile.

Osborne came naturally to Flowers, but the boyish enthusiasm of Raleigh was not so apt for L. May. Raleigh's now outmoded slang, his "fearfully " and his "topping," is the one thing that dates the play, and it is not yet so remote in time as not to seem incongruous. May's performance, though a little slow, was good but rather a tour de force. Hibbert was very well done by H. R. Windle. He was admirable as the funk; as the lewd reveller he was slightly less convincing. It was very unfortunate that he was too ill to play at the final performance, but J. M. Dawson made a surprisingly good attempt at the part with only a few hours notice. J. P. Peterken made a good Trotter; though he did not always resist the temptation to get easy laughs, he made it clear that there is a fundamental solidity and goodness of heart behind Trotter's easy-going attitude and care for his own comfort. 

Of the minor parts the batman Mason was admirably played by G. S. Finlayson. He needs to control an irritating mannerism of throwing up his hands, but his performance had a delightful solemnity, a sort of dryness which made it an authentic portrait of an officer's servant. Captain Hardy has nothing but the ungrateful task of warming up the first few minutes of the play, and this was well done by P. M. Baker. The Colonel (W. R. Layland) needed more dignity; he should be a weaker character than Stanhope, but he must present a facade. The Sergeant-Major (G. M. Macbeth) was on the first night grotesquely made up, and occasionally inaudible, but was much more convincing on the Saturday. I preferred J. S. Bingham's understudy performance of the German soldier to J. M. Dawson's original one.

The setting and the effects were satisfactory; it is a surprising proof of the spell of the stage illusion that one accepted as adequate representation of the gunfire the beating of a drum. But in the end one comes back to Mr. Watling; not till one has talked with the cast does one realise that his genius for production is not only a question of his remarkable insight and sensitivity; it is also an infinite capacity for taking pains.

E. D. T.

(Photographs by G. S. Finlayson and P. G. Mott; sketches below by H. Redston)

Looking Backward

S.R.G.S., 1885-1905

In his article in the last Magazine on Wesley College in 1859, Mr. Wrigley concluded with the hope that we should leave behind us a much more complete record of our activities than has been done by our predecessors. In an article ten years previously on Wesley College, 1837-1905, Mr. Watling outlined the whole history of the College and appealed for further information and records for publication in the Magazine. In writing this article my intention is to sketch the last twenty years of the Grammar School before its amalgamation with Wesley College to form King Edward VII School as we now know it. At the same time it is hoped that Old Boys and others associated with the School will send us further articles (however short) and any records which they may have which will help to complete the story in more detail. It is unfortunate that with such a rich history the present School has so few records. I have listed the main sources of my information at the end of this article but even these usually have to be consulted at the Public Library and do not exist in the School Library. The next section gives the main dates in the history of the School right from the beginning so that the period under review can be related to the whole history.

MAIN DATES IN THE SCHOOL'S HISTORY.

1604 Licence granted to erect "The Free Grammar School of King James of England." The school had one Master and one Usher and was carried on in a house leased from the Church Burgesses, which had been occupied by an earlier school in the previous century (v. Wigfull, I).

1648 A new school was built at the junction of Campo Lane and Townhead Street in an area which was radically altered in 1900. For a description, see Leader, p. 123, and Wigfull II.

1776 A local subscription taken to repair the buildings and increase the salaries of the Master and Usher.

1825 The new school opened in St. George's Square - this building was taken over by the Technical College in 1885 and demolished in 1912.

1836 Collegiate School opened (a proprietary school connected with the Church of England).

1838 Wesley College opened.

1885 Grammar School moved into the Collegiate School premises.

1888 Charity Commissioners issued new scheme of government.

1905 King Edward VII School opened in temporary premises - moved into the reconstructed Wesley College building in 1906.

THE UNION WITH THE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL.

From the beginning the Collegiate School had provided a classical education and established links with Oxford and Cambridge Universities by providing four Exhibitions out of its current income. On its opening some more advanced boys migrated from the Grammar School (118, 7) and subsequently boys who wanted to go on to the university finished their education at the Collegiate School after leaving the Grammar School (MI, 51). As with many other similar ventures it Was found that education cannot easily be run on a profit-making basis and already in the sixties the school was not controlled by the original trustees but was let to the Principal at a rent sufficient to meet the interest on the debt and the cost of repairs.

The 1944 Education Act was one of the more successful efforts which have been made over the last century-and-a-half to provide a satisfactory system of education in this country. 'Nearly a century earlier a Great Exhibition was held in London in 1851 which helped to cause a great upsurge in interest in education generally and in scientific and technical education in particular, as it was seen that without a reformed educational system England would not be able to face the increased competition from the rest of the world. One of the immediate developments was the formation of the Science and Art Department (a lineal forerunner of the present Ministry of Education) which gave grants for the teaching of science and organised examinations in scientific subjects. The Principal of the Collegiate School was in favour of organising a section for science as well as the existing ones for Classics and English. The present School Certificate examinations can also be traced back to these times as Oxford and Cambridge began their local examinations in 1858. In 1864 the Government set up the Schools Inquiry Commission which investigated the conditions existing in the endowed grammar and proprietary schools. Their report in 1868 revealed a low level, with most schools dominated by classics taught in a ridiculous way. The 1869 Endowed Schools Act set up a Commission to approve new schemes for these schools to bring them more in line with new educational ideas the powers of this Commission were subsequently transferred to the Charity Commissioners and then to the Board of Education.

In 1865, Mr. (later Sir) J. G. Fitch visited Sheffield for the Schools Inquiry Commission and reported that his visit interested him greatly the more so because so few of the proprietary schools in my district are flourishing and successful. and scarcely any of them aim so high, or achieve so much as the Collegiate." Of the Grammar School, which then had 122 day boys, he reported: " the general character of the institution was that of a secondary or commercial school of a high class rather than that of a purely grammar school, as it possessed no exhibition to the universities, and was in the midst of a large trading population: it was calculated under its then management to render great and increasing service to the town. even though it left one great want, that of a high or classical school, still unsupplied. (Filch, 250). Under J. E. Jackson. the Head Master from 1863 to 1884, the numbers increased to a maximum of about 180, and then decreased to Just over a hundred at the end of his period. In the same period the numbers at the Collegiate School also seem to have increased to about the same maximum and then decreased even more as one report gives only 40 boys in 1884, although this may have been due to the expected dissolution of the school. Part of the decrease in numbers is undoubtedly due to the opening in 1880 of the new Central School (the forerunner of High Storrs) by the local School Board set tip under the 1870 Education Act. This was the first of its kind to be erected in the country and was one of the most successful; while administered under the elementary code it was the experience of schools like this which was partly responsible for the expansion of Secondary Education tinder the 1902 Education Act.

The new trends in education locally and nationally and the appointment of a new Head Master to the Grammar School led to renewed negotiations with the Endowed School Commissioners in 1884. The transfer to the Collegiate premises was not delayed but the negotiations with the Commissioners dragged out until they issued the new scheme for the school in 1888. Previously the School Governors had been almost identical with the Church Burgesses and the details of the school business were kept in their order book for some time ('VII., 59). Under the new arrangements the Governing Body was made partly representative, having three representatives from the City Council. two from the School Board, two from the Town Trustees and two from Firth College (subsequently Sheffield University), in addition to six cooptative members. Later two more representatives were added from the City Technical Instruction Committee when this aided the school. The Foundation Scholarships, previously in the nomination of the Governors, were made competitive and were never to be less than fifteen in number. The Town Trustees voted a grant of £150 p. a. for leaving scholarships to the Universities. There was to be a pension fiend for the Head Master and accommodation was to be provided for not less than 300 boys, who had to be at least seven years old.

THE PROGRESS OF THE SCHOOL UNDER SENIOR.

Anybody entering the present school and having to wait in the vestibule will soon notice the plate commemorating the Headmastership of the Rev. Edward Senior from 1884 to 1899. While it would be wrong to attribute all the development in the school during this period to one man, it is obvious that he played quite a large part in building up the school. He was a Cambridge M.A., having been a scholar and prizeman of St. Catherine's College, 30th Wrangler (i.e., 30th in order of merit in the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos), as well as a London B.A. Before his appointment he had been an Assistant Master at Rossall School for two years. Immediately on his appointment, Senior had to superintend the transfer to the Collegiate premises, in which building the school reassembled after the Easter 1885 holidays. The premises consisted of the Headmasters house, south of the school field, and the school itself. With the fives courts they cost £7,000. and were acquired by public subscriptions; over £2,000 was spent in putting the school and playground into good order. Subsequently a Physical Laboratory and Lecture Room, a Manual Training and Drawing Room, and two new class-rooms were added and the Chemistry Laboratory extended. Many of these developments were only made possible by the grant of £600 p.a., which the City Technical Instruction Committee made from 1891 onwards under the powers they were given by the 1889 Technical Instruction Act and the 1890 Local Taxation Act. The 1897 Report on Sheffield Charities made on behalf of the Charity Commissioners lists the accommodation as a central hall (also used as a gymn.), five class rooms, manual training room, physics lecture room and a chemistry laboratory. The latter had room for 23 boys, the manual room for 20, and the physics laboratory for only six. Professor Turnbull states that in 1899 there was a large room, seating 30 or more, in tiers, with a large bench and at least three double benches for practical work so that a class of about 20 could all do elementary practical physics at once. In addition the whole of the work of the preparatory department was carried out in the Headmaster's house where there were two small class-rooms; this also had accommodation for twenty boarders as well as a few assistant masters. Despite these extensions the accommodation available was well below that necessary for the figure of three hundred boys mentioned as the minimum desirable on the reorganisation of the school. Up to the end of the century the numbers usually varied between 160 and 180 but they increased to just over the two hundred before the close of the school.

Under Senior the School had three divisions the Preparatory consisted of two forms for boys under about 12: the Lower School consisted of Forms I, II, and III; the Upper School had a University Remove Form, a Commercial Form, and Forms IV, V and VI. Professor Turnbull, who entered the school in 1894, writes: " My case was typical of several boys. (one term in Prep. 2, three terms in Prep. 1, one term in each of form 1, 2, 3, and one or two in remove, and 4 and 5: about three years in the 6th and probably two years of this in the upper sixth. No attempt was made to dragoon boys into ' years '." The Upper School was divided into two departments, called University and Commercial. The latter declined in numbers until the scheme was changed and boys who were intending to stay on at school chose the former whether or not they were intending to enter a university. The Sixth Form was slowly built up from none in 1884 to about a dozen. Between 1889 and 1895 sixteen boys went on to the universities. Boys were prepared for a variety of examinations (the present School Certificate was organised later to avoid this duplication of examinations) and the main successes are recorded on the Honours Boards which are outside the dining room of the present building.

The school was also divided into divisions according to the boys' ability in mathematics, and sections for science. Professor Turnbull writes: " We started Latin in Prep. I (French also). Greek about Form 3 or so. Mathematics was generally run on the 'modular' system; i.e., top and 4th divisions simultaneously, 2nd and 5th, 3rd and 6th, in three classrooms. Thus we in the 4th sat behind division 1 and were taught by Senior.One set would work examples while the other set got some teaching. A happy state of things, for Senior often left the work on the blackboard. Thus a boy in division 4 might see the formula (for the binomial theorem) on the board-as I did, and be thoroughly intrigued, and learn it years before it was officially taught; x1/2 also appeared and led to the natural interpretation."

Summarising his experience, Professor Turnbull writes: " We got an excellent all-round training at the school: how good it was I have only realised since, on comparing it with other schools."

SPORTS AND OTHER SCHOOL ACTIVITIES.

Under Senior's reign a large number of new activities seem to have been started and a number of others were continued and developed. The details of these, as well as of a number of other points in this article, are often taken from the School Magazine which was issued five times a year and which itself began in 1889. In its early numbers it deplores the lack of written history of the school and subsequently contains a number of historical articles of various phases of the Collegiate and Grammar Schools. A number of the reports from various societies take the form of original papers by boys at school which were often very good and could well be emulated by their successors. From the beginning the magazine is closely linked with the Old Boys' Association which was formed about the same time and which promoted various meetings besides the annual dinner. In 1890, the Debating Society was started and also, partly in connection with it, a School Library. The society changed its form several times, reappearing later as the Literary Society and then later still being amalgamated with the Science Society which had itself sprang from a Natural History society. At both these societies the majority of the papers were by the boys themselves, although the staff and visitors also gave some. There was considerable interest in 1895 when lantern slides were first used-the society also built up a small museum and library. The Dramatic Society gave its first performance in 1895. K. E. Kirk, who was the first to win the Akroyd Scholarship and who is now Bishop of Oxford, was then an outstanding writer and prime mover in dramatic work.

It is now eighty years since the first Grammar School Sports were held and they were a regular feature of the period under review, with the usual events and prizes and a dearth of entrants for the Old Boys' Races. Swimming Sports are also mentioned but it is not said where they were held; the 1897 Report mentions Senior's desire to have a swimming bath as well as a separate gymnasium. Soccer was only introduced a few years before the move to Collegiate Crescent and matches were played against Rotherham. Chesterfield, Doncaster. Leeds and Barnsley Grammar Schools, Wesley College, Technical School, Medicals, Sheffield Club and the Bankers. Cricket matches were played against man. of the same teams. The great cricket match of the season was the one against the Clergy. This began in the morning the others only started after school hours. In nearly all the cricket matches we find that some members of the staff played for the school team. From comments in the magazine and from Professor Turnbull's letter it appears that there was intense rivalry between the School and Wesley College. At football, " Wesley College regularly beat us: only in December, 1894. my first term, we won 3--0 and I got a thoroughly wrong impression of events: for I never saw another victory.In cricket it was rather better. We won twice in the ten years (on the second occasion) we were out for moderate score, but everything went right when we fielded. Dodson bowled wonderfully and took 9 wickets, a record which was only spoilt by my running a fellow out Although the main school field had been rested for a season, it could not stand up to the wear and tear of continual use, and in 1900 an appeal was made for £2,000 for additional playing fields. Professor Turnbull describes the rather dull and undulating ground „ which was acquired and opened in November 1901 and present school-boys will recognise from the description that the fields bought are those we now use at Whiteley Woods.

THE LAST PERIOD UNDER A. B. HASLAM.

In 1891 the Rev. A. Brooke Haslam joined the school as Classics master and was subsequently appointed Second Master. He was a Foundation Scholar of St. John's College, Cambridge, where he obtained first class honours in Classics. He had been at school at Rugby under the well-known Head Master Temple, who became Archbishop of Canterbury, and presented the prizes at one of the speech days. Haslam had been an assistant master at Cheltenham School for six years and then from 1879 he had been Head Master at Ripon Grammar School. Professor Turnbull writes: " Haslam was a great classics teacher, and had little opinion of mathematics. My father had the utmost difficulty in getting him to let my elder brother and me switch over to more mathematics during our last two or three years at school." His ability as a Classics teacher is born out by the distinctions won by his students. In 1898 Senior was ordered to have a rest because of his health, and Haslam became acting Head Master. After returning for a term later in the year, Senior had to be given further leave and then in 1899 he retired, but did not live much longer. Meanwhile Haslam had started reorganising the school and his appointment as Head Master seems to have been expected although there were over a hundred applications for the post.

Haslam introduced our present system of 3-hour lessons, with seven periods a day. ending at 4.15,. but with half-holidays on Tuesday,. Thursday and Saturday, as compared with only Wednesdays and Saturdays before. In this way it became possible to arrange for optional subjects. Form masters taught their own forms more than they had done previously and lessons in the main subjects were arranged to take place concurrently. The school was divided into university (or classical) and modern sides and the scientific side became a School of Science, recognised by the Science and Art Department. The university side in the Upper School took Latin, Greek or German, French and Mathematics, but Professor Turnbull deprecates the fact that they could no longer take science. The modern side was either scientific or commercial; the former took English, French, German (Spanish if required), Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Drawing and Manual Work while the commercials took shorthand and bookkeeping.

In 1895 the Royal Commission on Secondary Education had issued its report and in the preparation of this, A. P. Laurie had inspected the schools in the West Riding and compared their conditions with those observed by J. C. Fitch thirty years earlier. He had commented on the small size of the Grammar School, the very small sixth form and consequent poor entry to the universities. He emphasised the small use which was made of the physics laboratory as only a few boys at the top of the school used it and there was no attempt made to give all the boys a course of elementary practical physics, but it appears that subsequently, possibly as a result of this comment, greater use was made of the physics laboratory (see Professor Turnbull's comment on the laboratory mentioned earlier). In general, he said, "there was a want of briskness and brightness in the teaching."

In 1902 the Education Act was passed and began the system of Secondary (Grammar) Schools with the local authorities being responsible. Sir Michael Sadler, a leading educationist, then Professor of Education at Manchester University and subsequently Vice-Chancellor of Leeds University, was ask( d to prepare a report on Secondary and Higher Education in Sheffield for the guidance of the city council. In this report he writes: "The weakest spot in the educational arrangements of the City is in the secondary education provided for boys. Neither school is at present in a position to provide the kind of higher secondary education which a great city like Sheffield needs, and ought to have. There is need for a secondary school which should give the highest instructions in English, in classics, in mathematics and in foreign languages, together with instruction in science. Were the way to open at the present time for a union between the Grammar School and the Wesley College. there would be considerable advantage In reference to the Grammar School, Sadler said that more class-rooms were needed. that a good library was necessary and supported the Board of Education which had urged an improvement in the laboratories. He also mentioned the need for some masters to take higher subjects, including mathematics, and urged that every care should be taken in their appointment. As Wesley College authorities were also contemplating altering their governing system and increasing their local connections. Sadler's suggestion for a union of the two schools bore fruit. The new school started in Wesley College premises but took the old name. suitably modified to refer to the reigning monarch instead of to his predecessor of three centuries before.

THE STAFF.

It is impossible in this article to give even the names of all the staff during this period. This in itself is an indication of the progress made because it was only earlier in the nineteenth century that a Third Master, in addition to the Head and Second Master, had been appointed. Usually, too, the Third Master was only a senior boy who was teaching while he was continuing his own education and possibly before going on to the university. In this century there were about ten other full-time masters, in addition to the Head and Second Masters and two ladies for the Beginners' Class and a number of visiting part-time masters for special subjects. Of the full-time staff the great majority were graduates of different universities.

Haslam's Second Master was J. H. Hodgetts who had come to the School as first form master in 1890. He was a Senior Optime (Second Class Honours in Mathematics) and Scholar of Queen's College, Cambridge. From his report we can infer that Sadler was not very impressed with the teaching of Mathematics at an advanced level. Professor Turnbull says that Hodgetts `" was an excellent teacher of mathematics " but that " because he was tied to so many other groups of boys for teaching " he had to leave the more advanced boys on their own a great deal. Thus Turnbull had "to read the calculus etc., more or less alone with occasional help from Hodgetts." Consequently Sadler's criticism probably meant that the school was understaffed on the mathematical side after Senior's retirement.

From his letter Professor Turnbull seems to have been most impressed with S. J. Chapman, of whom he writes: " I had great luck at the start: S. J. Chapman somehow was master in Prep. II in 1894. Anyhow I was under the charge of a first-class man for my first term, and he influenced me greatly. Only far later did I realise how exceptional he was." Chapman had been educated at Manchester Grammar School and Owens College, Manchester and taught at the school from 1893 to 1895. He left to go to Cambridge whence, after a brilliant career, he went as a lecturer at Cardiff University College, before returning to Manchester as the Professor of Political Economy. After the first world war he became the Permanent Secretary of the Board of Trade and a member of many important economic committees.

Of other masters Professor Turnbull writes:

"Scripture, including Greek Testament, was well taught: and I remember the real interest in reading through St. Mark's gospel with Jack Latham in the Third Form. J. L. taught us trigonometry later: his great formula was "sine squared pig plus cosine squared pig equals one." He drove home the idea of the arbitrary variable in an identity. He also taught music and choral singing: no great shakes until that wizard Sir Henry Coward took us on, about 1902 or so, and made a world of difference. He was quite first rate and made the Sheffield Choir world famous. In 1897 I witnessed Coward conducting from a high scaffold 70,000 school children, gathered in Norfolk Park, singing to Queen Victoria and accompanied by about half a dozen large brass bands placed spokewise about sixty yards away in six directions. A complete success which utterly baffled the pundits from London who came to scoff."

REFERENCES.

On first coming to the school I was very interested to read Mr. Watling's account of Wesley College in the June 1937 issue of the Magazine. Mr. Wrigley wrote an article in the last (December, 1947) issue about Wesley College in 1859. Throughout this article I have been quoting from letters to the writer by H. W. Turnbull, F.R.S., Regius Professor of Mathematics in the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. His father was W. P. Turnbull, His Majesty's Divisional Inspector of Schools, and closely connected with the school while his sons were in attendance. While at school he won a scholarship in mathematics to Trinity College, Cambridge as well as the local Earnshaw scholarship. At Cambridge he was Second Wrangler and a Smiths Prizeman and became a Fereday Fellow of St. John's College, Oxford. After lecturing at Cambridge, Liverpool and Hong Kong he returned to England during the first war and was an Assistant Master at Repton School and one of His Majesty's Inspectors of Schools before his appointment at St. Andrews in 1921. He is one of the leading algebraists in British Mathematics and has a world-wide reputation.

References to the SRGS Magazine issued from 1889 to 1905 in fifteen annual volumes have been indicated as M8, 7, meaning volume 8, p. 7.

Wigfull, James R.—
(I) An Early Sheffield School, THAS, vol, III, p. 336-343.
(II) Sheffield Grammar School, THAS, vol. IV, p. 283-300.

Smith, G. C. Moore—
Sheffield Grammar School; THAS, vol. IV, p. 145-160.

these three articles are all in the Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society.

Leader, R. E. Sheffield in the Eighteenth Century, 2nd edn.; 1905.

Fitch, J. G. Schools Inquiry Commission Report, vol. XVIII.

City of Sheffield Endowed Charities Report, 1897 - this includes the 1828 Report which contains some interesting material on the Grammar School in the earlier days.

Laurie, A. P. Royal Commission on Secondary Education, vol. VII, p. 127.

Sadler, M. E. Report on Secondary and Higher Education in Sheffield, 1903.

P. J. W.

A Wesley College Souvenir

IN January, 1946, the Headmaster received a letter from a rating in the American Navy, Bernard Levine, saying that he had bought from a Chinese coolie in Hong Kong a medal presented to LAURENCE WILSON, a boy at Wesley College, for Proficiency in Modern Languages in the summer of 1880, and asking whether the owner could be traced. With the help of Mr. H. R. Bramley, himself an Old Boy of Wesley College, it was discovered that Mr. Wilson's sister, Miss Edith Wilson, still lives at 14, Rutland Park not a quarter of a mile from the School and the medal was handed over to her on February 3rd, 1947.

Mr. Laurence Wilson was a boy at Wesley College for seven years, was articled to a solicitor in Sheffield and then went out to Calcutta, where his father was the owner and Editor of the Indian Daily News. It is thought that he died in China.

Reveille

THE people are flocking into the School gates; boys and parents hurry up the main steps, out of the cold, dark night, into the welcome warmth and light of the assembly hall. There is an air of expectant excitement in here, for tonight we are going to see the School Dramatic Society's annual play.

Behind the curtains there is a feeling of nervous suspense much-marked scripts are being scanned for the last time; last minute additions to make-up are being hastily applied, and all the many "props" are being given their final check-over.

All is ready; the somewhat scratchy record is allowed to play itself out, and then, in a sudden hush, the house-lights go down and the curtain slowly rises .

The play is over; the hall empty, silent, and dark, except for a pale glimmer of moonlight which shines through lofty windows, onto row upon row of seats, dimly illuminating the lowered curtains.

Then suddenly a flash of lightning rips the brassy stillness of the sky; a peal of thunder trembles through the heavens, shaking the very foundations of the hall; and the wind, as if stirred into anger, howls against the windows. This is the overture.

Again the curtain rises, again there is a momentary hush, and then.the play is on, and here, in real life, are Stanhope, Osborne and Raleigh, acting their ghastly parts again. And with the wind came the drone of many voices moaning, chanting voices, growing louder.

"Tanks, bombs, submarines, poison-gas, shells, aeroplanes," they wail above the screech of bombs, the deathly cackle of the machine-guns, and the roar of diving planes.

" The battle of the Mons, the Somme, Ypres, Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele." the voices scream.

In a great clap of thunder the actors wither away, but the moaning voices gather in power, chanting their hideous song. The hall shivers, the windows shatter their glass, and the wind rips the walls asunder.

J.M.D.

On Returning to School in the Afternoon

BEING one of those fortunate mortals who do not have to chance the hazards of School Dinner, it is my doubtful privilege to pass through the West door on my return no less than four times a week. At a rough estimate I am almost sent flying off my feet fully three times per week by some terrified youth who is running full tilt for the sanctuary of the playground to escape a horrible fate at the hands of his colleagues who are thirsting for his blood inside. More often than not, I would have just recovered from the effects of this, when the pursuer would fly out in full cry and deal me a blow with some part of his person on some part of mine (usually the head and the abdomen respectively). But by now I have learnt the secret of avoiding this. It is all a matter of timing. As soon as the first collision, which is almost inevitable, has occurred the thing is to get inside the door as quickly as possible and hold oneself to one side to escape the second fury.

Having negotiated this, I deposit my clothes in my locker (which is just by the door) and proceed warily. The next thing one sees is some little boys pressing themselves feverishly against the side of a row' of lockers with a look of fear or expectation in their eyes (this depends on whether the youth in question is avoiding capture or setting an ambush) and with a grimy finger pressed to their lips coupled with a hoarse supplication to a fellow-" Don't tell old So-and-so I'm here."

I next turn right, along the bottom corridor, and the eye is met by a long passage flanked on the left by window-sills on which a myriad occupations are being indulged in, the main one being the ever-popular "shove-ha 'penny," closely followed by homework and comic-reading. in that order. If some miserable wretch, be he even a prefect, should inadvertently catch the elbow of a player of shove-ha'penny, even if he is merely a second-former, as he is playing a stroke, then, to use a hackneyed phrase, he's " had it." He is met by a superior and contemptuous gaze, and execrations are poured down on the head of the offender who, if he is wise, beats a hasty retreat.

Then come the two glass-panelled doors of the Dining Hall, from behind which comes a buzz of conversation as if there is a general discussion on the latest case of food poisoning or malnutrition. Or am I being too harsh? Continuing on my leisurely way, I come to the Gym Changing Room where once, I remember, some enterprising youth used to sell pastries, which, despite the rather exacting price, used to go like wildfire. Shades of 1943! But now all that remains is a youth or two who chews silently and resignedly at a piece of cake. or who hastily completes last night's homework, sacrificed for a visit to the pictures, or who reads enthralled the. adventures of Tinker Cobb prizefighter in this week's "Adventure." Then, turning right again, I eventually reach the open air and give my all in a game of football watched by an admiring (?) and critical audience from the library windows. At about two o'clock the Headmaster stalks past with a condescending smile at the likes of us, and a few minutes later we don our coats and depart to various form-rooms to the more mundane atmosphere of the lesson.

I. J. G. MARSHALL

The Pocket-Money Problem

THE ''allowance" problem is growing from day to day. with the rise of the cost-of-living index.

Recently I conducted some research into the amount of pocket-money received by boys in one form. This ranged from one shilling to six and sixpence. There were also boys who just received their expenses. Earn as you spend, so to speak. This, I think, is quite a good scheme, especially if the limit to spending is put reasonably high. say up to five shillings.

The real problem is. however, the amount of money a. boy should receive. This point has been thrashed out and chewed over in, I should say, millions of homes. Personally. I am not in favour of large allowances. i.e., over seven and sixpence a week; this. I maintain. leads to wastefulness in later life when the money does not come so easily. The ideal sum is somewhere in the region of three to five shillings. This leads to economy and thrift, and leaves room for an adequate budget. with a little left over to put by each week.

Here is a specimen budget of an average boy:

 

s.

 d.

Amusements (varied)

2

6

Sweet Ration

1

0

(Parents to buy the rest).

   

Money spent on  ones Hobby

1

0

     

Weekly Total

4

6

This. I admit. does not leave much out of the allowance, but, on occasion, the expenditure will probably work out at less than this amount.

Then. of course. there is the question of transport fares-should these come out of the allowance or be a separate item? I think they should be separate. But those who give their sons a lump sum for both pocket-money and fares maintain that it cuts down the lazy habit of riding where walking would do, because the boy knows that the more he walks the more he saves. But if only the bare essential is given for the day, this difficulty is overcome at once.

Another question which comes to mind when thinking sadly of spending the last three-pence on a bar of chocolate (3d. for a bar of chocolate!) is how to earn more money to supplement the exhausted allowance. In snowy weather it is easy. All you have to do is to arm yourself with a snow-scraper and sally forth, knocking at doors where (a) the snow has not been cleared, and (b) where the occupant is either too old or too ill to do it. Of course you do not ask for money, but a small tip (sometimes very small) is usually forthcoming.

In Spring there are gardens to be dug. and in Summer lawns to be mown, both of which occupations can be quite lucrative if tackled in the right way.

But Autumn is the problem: most people can sweep up leaves and light bonfires, so one must resort to the arduous and undignified task of delivering papers, unless of course there are errands to be run, which activity does not amply repay the time and energy expended.

I should appreciate the views of any readers on this vexed question.

I. M. BULLOCK

Music

CHOIR and Orchestra have this term been enthusiastically engaged on preparations for the performance of Handel's St. John Passion at St. John's Ranmoor, on March 22nd.

The choir is most fortunate at the moment in its soloists-Mr. Atkins (bass). I. Fells (baritone), D. H. Thorpe (alto), and G. E. Nutter R. P. Gregory (trebles). and so we have on! .­gone outside the school for the part of the Evangelist (tenor). Tenors and Basses have increased in numbers, but still do not yet balance the enthusiastic body of trebles. Mr. Bramhall. Mr. David and Mr. Fisher have materially strengthened the tenors. The alto section. ably led by I. H. Jones, have been singing well, though here again an increase in numbers would help. Experiments in singing with Fourth and Remove music sets have shown that there must be many more boys in Fifths and above who are capable of extracting enjoyment from singing.

At the School Chapel Service a Bach melody from the Schemelli collection was sung as an anthem.

The Orchestra has been strengthened by the appearance of Mr. Atkins as a cellist, and has been rehearsing the Gavotte and Bourree from Bach's Suite in D as well as the Handel accompaniments. The viola line is being reinforced by the addition of a third violin section. and there is thus an opportunity for violinists not yet skilled in the higher positions to join N. Wordsworth in a very important part of the orchestra..

The Recorder Club, now numbering among its instruments a Dolmetsch treble recorder, has been meeting weekly to play trios by XVIth and XVIIth century composers.

N.J.B.

MUSIC SOCIETY.

Each of the four Tuesday meetings of the Music Club this term has taken the form of a Gramophone Concert. On January 13. J. M. Hughes gave us the terminal Mozart concert. and at a lively meeting on January 20. L. H. Scott played symphonies by Schubert and Mendelssohn. On February 3. P. J. Landin presented a Bach organ prelude and fugue and a Beethoven quartet, while at the final meeting on February 17, D. G. Armytage played Schumann's song-cycle Dichterliebe " and works by Senaille. Bach and Beethoven.

Thus the term has been unusual in the complete absence of talks. At the last meeting of the Christmas term. however. a date too late for inclusion in last term's Magazine, Mr. Tappe gave us an interesting and witty exposition on the general subject of " Music for piano duet." With Mr. Atkins he played some enjoyable illustrations of his remarks, including works by 'Mozart. Weber. Schubert, Schumann and others.

In addition, two lunch-hour concerts have been held. On January 2. Mr. Graham gave sympathetic renderings of clarinet pieces by Mozart and Schumann, and 'Ir. Barnes ably interpreted the sharply-contracted piano writing of Brahms and Eugene Goossens. On February 12, Nutter sang songs by Handel and Martin Shaw-. Mr. Barnes and Mr. Atkins played a piano-duet arrangement of Warlock's " Capriol Suite,-' and Mr. Atkins gave a spirited performance of some settings of Lear's nonsense poems by Hely-Hutchison. and of Vaughan-Williams' cycle, " Songs of Travel."

J.M.H.

International Discussion Group

AFTER the Magazine had gone to press last term, three further meetings of the Group were held. In the first, Mrs. Herklots gave a talk on Rumania, a country of which she has personal experience. She explained that Rumania is in the throes of troubles that are only to be expected for a country historically new, minerally wealthy and socially unbalanced, emerging from a war in which she lost:x00,000 men and from two years of drought and famine. Such a country is a happy hunting-ground for Communism; and the Communists, although the Rumanians are not in complete sympathy with them, have removed all political opposition. Of the subsequently deposed Michael, she said that he was a virtual prisoner, his value being in the psychological sense of security which he inspired.

The following week M. Brachet, a Frenchman in England on a scouting mission, introduced an interesting discussion on France. He dealt in the main with the French industrial situation, referring in particular to the strikes at the Renault motor works near Paris.

The term was rounded off with a discussion led by our President. Mr. Cumming, on the subject Planning " in all its controversial aspects. Man has advanced. Mr. Cumming said, from the cave. to the village. to the town. to the nation. and must now decide whether to proceed to his logical conclusion the world. In the past the economic system has been boom slump--boom  slump, are we now to have controlled economy to ensure an international standard of living, and if so, what of liberty? The discussion which followed was very lively, but harmony was reached. over a proposed International Barter System. This was thought to be primitive, but suited to the present primitive international conditions.

The present term was opened with a report by Bingham, Crowe, Carding-Wells and McNaught on the Christmas Conference of the C.E.W.C. (that should no longer require expansion). That the speakers at the conference all betrayed anxiety over another war by their studious evasion of all mention of it appears to have been the main impression left upon our representatives by the conference.

The following week Miss Hoyland, the North of England Secretary of the C.E.W.C., gave us an account of the aims and activities of the Council in Sheffield. Wright and May have been subsequently elected to represent our views at the Council's business meetings.

The arrival in Sheffield of the Atomic Train precipitated a discussion on the " Politics of the Atomic Bomb." led once more by Mr. Cumming. He gave us a short history of the Bomb itself and of the attempts to control it by a United Nations Commission. Heated argument followed, with Geeson and Carding-Wells to the forefront of the pacifists and anti-pacifists respectively.

At our next meeting we were given an expert talk on the West Indies by Mr. Sarkar, a Trinidadian. He explained that the islands` chief difficulties are not the consequence of absence of economic wealth, but of the mismanagement of it, caused by political ignorance and foreign exploitation. An interesting fact was that, though most of the islands are very cosmopolitan in population, the main language spoken is English.

The Group combined with the Student Christian Movement to hear the talk on " Morality and Politics " given by Mr. Symonds, an "outside" expert. He said that morality demands an interest in politics, and that party-politics are necessary to democracy.

Our last meeting before the Magazine went to press was a debate on the motion: Nationalism is out of date." Green, moving the motion, claimed that nationalism is a belief in the self-sufficiency of nations, and that nations are no longer self-sufficient. Carding-Wells, opposing. wanted to preserve individualism, the main-spring of culture and civilisation, from the sterility and barrenness of centralisation and the totalitarianism which follows inevitably in its wake. The motion was carried by two votes.

In conclusion, we thank Mr. Cumming for the time and energy he so ungrudgingly expends in his work as President of our Group.

P.S.G.

Scientific Society

A T the Annual General Meeting last term it was decided to consider a programme of lectures for the season as it seemed that visits to Works would not now be a possibility. Fortunately this pessimistic outlook proved to be unjustified.

The first lecture to the Society was given by Mr. Towers on "The Weather." This instructive talk, well illustrated by photographs and charts from meteorological publications, indicated the method by which the everyday weather forecasts are made, and explained why they sometimes go wrong. We record our thanks to Mr. Towers.

The second lecture was delivered by an Old Boy of the School, Dr. J. H. Chesters, who is well known in England and U.S.A. for his expert knowledge on refractory linings of steel furnaces. He spoke to us on the fascinating topic of the very latest research in the architecture of furnaces and the methods of automatic control of heat and its flow in such furnaces. We were given a very impressive idea of the vast number of interlacing factors in the problem and we are very grateful to him for the excellent talk delivered in his own matter-of-fact and humorous manner.

Our third meeting was unusual in that the central figures were two members of the Sixth who gave us short talks, well illustrated. Layland spoke on " The Effects of High Pressure," and MacDougall on "Allergy." They were remarkably good talks and we owe our gratitude to them for their care in the preparation of these. We anticipate more of this kind of function in the future.

This term we had a lecture by Dr. Jowett of the Sheffield University, on " Statistics," and some of the applications. It was on unusual ground for us, and was well illustrated and interesting, as the very pertinent questions by the audience after the talk demonstrated.

Of the four visits fixed up for this term, two took place on February 18th, one when a party of boys visited Messrs. Mappin & Webb's Works, and saw a vast range of processes in the making of cutlery and silverware. finishing up with a well detailed study of the electroplating shops: the other to the Queens Road Corporation Tram Repair Sheds. Again a large variety of activities in relation to the work kept us interested. The final demonstration on a tram itself of the various devices and controls is always a very popular feature, and rounds off well a very instructive visit. We are indebted to Messrs. Mappin & Webb and to the Corporation Tramways Department for allowing us these privileges.

We are now looking forward to two more visits, two short talks by VI Form members, and also a lecture by Dr. A. Fells, as a finish to the Term's activities.

H. R.

Loan of Pictures

THANKS to the kindness of the Sheffield Society for the Encouragement of Art, the following pictures have been loaned to the School for a period of three months, and may be seen in the Dining Hall and Art Room. An invitation to view is extended to those members of the School who do not normally frequent the art Room.

TITLE.

ARTIST.

Coster Girls

Sir William Rothenstein.

Self Portrait

Townroe.

Sheffield from Snig Hill.

Henry Rushbury, R.A., R.W.S.

Sheffield during the Coal Strike, from Norfolk Park

Frank Saltfleet.

Seascape

T. Churchyard.

Ruined Abbey

Sir Francis Chantrey.

Globe and Maps

Ernest Sichel.

Seascape

Buxton Knight.

The Garden

Evelyn Dunbar.

The Plant Table

Cyril Mahoney.


Student Christian Movement

THE S.C.M. group  was  started towards the end of last term and the support promised and shown at the subsequent meetings augurs well for the future. It was also encouraging to see several members at the Conference held in Sheffield during the Christmas holidays. This term we have had two meetings. The first was a discussion on " Miracles " introduced by Mr. Moore. There were some lively arguments and several different view-points, some accepting Miracles and Christianity, some accepting Christianity but not Miracles and a small but united band of sceptics who preferred to ignore the supernatural. Our second meeting was held with the I.D.G., when Mr. Symonds talked on "Morality in Politics." At the time of writing, we intend to hold two further meetings this term.

We hope that members will give their serious consideration to inter-school activities, including a hike in the Easter holidays.

T. E. K.

Cine Club

OUR most successful undertaking so far this term has been the Club Social, at which we had an attendance at least double that- of the lectures we have had to date. We have had a few very entertaining and none the less enlightening talks, ranging from " Little Things That Matter," to “The History of The Cinema," and I hope one or two more will follow before the term ends.

At long last we have managed to obtain a diminutive quantity of the film necessary to commence work on this years production. When we shall see the finished result on the screen I would not like to prophesy, but with present film supplies our progress will be painfully slow.

D. J. D. Wood is showing his sound film about Sheffield's water supply at the school. It certainly is an exceptionally worthy effort in the documentary field.

G.S.F.

The Library

DISCRIMINATION in the choice of books which they borrow has been noticeable this term in regular users of the library and in some newcomers. I hope this tendency will persist and lead to enquiries in the various sub ject libraries, details of which are posted in the library together with lists of recent acquisitions. A note on the Mathematical Library is attached. Attention is also invited to the growing Local History Section in Room 8, consisting of books relating to Hallamshire, Sheffield, and the School.

A nucleus has been already assembled and we should be grateful if Old Edwardians or boys at the School would look over their shelves to see if there is any book of local interest which they feel they could spare to present to this section of the Library. Presentations to the general or subject libraries or a donation to purchase a new book for the library would also be welcomed from those leaving the School.

A small band of constant enthusiasts from the Transitus devour Current Affairs in the daily and weekly papers. The bound volumes of Punch from the Junior School, the social history of a past generation, are ever in demand. Boys should appreciate the care taken by their predecessors to preserve these and hand them on, and at the same time remember to handle current weekly numbers of Punch with the same care for their condition so that they may afford pleasure and enlightenment to future Edwardians. Some reviews of recent additions are appended.

R.C.H.

THE MATHEMATICAL LIBRARY

During the last few months, the Library has been growing by leaps and bounds, and by half-term we had a stock of some 150 books. Whilst many of these are, of course, primarily for the use of those studying the subject, there are a number that should appeal to a rather wider circle. If, for instance, there should be a "modern " who has no Maths., but would like to know what it is all about, G. H. Hardy's A Mathematician's Apology will answer all his questions, or if a more technical approach is required there is always Hogben's Mathematics for the Million. And if there is a classic who would like a comprehensive Mathematical background to the philosophy of Plato and Socrates, we have two enormous volumes on Greek Mathematics which have not been borrowed now for 10 years. On the History side, there is a very interesting account of the Story of Reckoning in the Middle Ages by F. A. Yeldham. There are also a number of books on Relativity and one or two on Astronomy, but these are unfortunately a little dated. One of our present aims is to obtain a complete collection of the numerous works of that indefatigable Victorian mathematician. S. L. Loney. It remains only to mention the card index, a very comprehensive affair which has taken months to prepare, and is at long last in working order. All visitors to Room 63 are cordially invited to inspect it, free of charge.

What is Mathematics? An elementary approach to ideas and methods. By R. COWART and H. ROBBINS.

This book falls into that category so contemptuously labelled "American." During the course of its 500 pages it attempts to survey the whole of the modern mathematical field-a well-nigh impossible task as the reader will find out, for not only is the book far from `' Elementary" but it is also extremely condensed. It is however well worth the trouble of looking at. If one can penetrate such extraordinary phrases as "swing a semi-circle with center 0," one will find in it a wealth of interesting and stimulating information. The book must however be used intelligently; often it is advisable to skip large chunks here and there, particularly in the case of those who no longer study the subjects in school. On the whole I feel that the opening chapters are the most rewarding. Here we are plunged into the natural numbers, and the theory of numbers, and although even here much of it needs close and careful reading, one comes away from it with far clearer ideas than before. B.A.G.

Grierson on Documentary. Edited by FORSYTH HARDY.

This book consists of a series of essays by John Grierson which have been collected from many sources by Forsyth Hardy, the film critic to The Scotsman. Grierson was a Scot, teacher, civil servant, thinker, but, above all, a sociologist with a great faith in the film as a medium for the propagation of ideas which can materially help to improve the health, happiness and harmony of life on this planet. In the collection of writings dating from 1930 to 1945 we see something of how Grierson, who has justly been called the father of documentary, built up the documentary film movement in this country to the position of world pre-eminence and influence which it holds today. And do not let us forget that the present renaissance in British films is largely founded on the work carried out by the documentary producers of Soho during the thirties.

In this book we read of the background to documentary, and, incidentally, a penetrating analysis of all that is good and bad in the average commercial film. Grierson's remarks on comedy and farce are worthy of the attention of all interested in art in any of its phases. We learn too how, when their works were spurned by the large distributors, the documentary producers set up their own organisations for the distribution of their films, and how in so doing they reached a hitherto untapped audience of serious thinkers in adult education classes, youth clubs and the like. This collection of writings, ably introduced and annotated by Forsyth Hardy, together with over?00 well-chosen and reproduced stills (many of which are published here for the first time) constitute a very valuable contribution to the literature of the film. D.J.D.W.

Association Football. By F. N. S. CREEK.

The author, himself a well-known amateur footballer who has played for both England and Cambridge and now is an official lecturer of the Football Association, here embraces everything that need be known in association football whether from the individual or from the team point of view. All the complicated moves and contemporary tactics are elucidated with the help of over thirty action photographs and numerous diagrams. It is difficult to think of anything the author has omitted. This is a book which should be read by the young enthusiast, for the author's ideas on ball control, tackling, heading and kicking are all from a person who does not confine his subjects only to England and, who being a schoolmaster himself, is constantly in touch with various problems which beset the beginner.

Besides dealing with the practical side of football, Mr. Creek goes out of his way to put forward quite impartially the arguments for and against the present system of refereeing, and inserts a chapter on soccer as a profession. The chapter on soccer in schools is of interest to everybody at this stage. Mr. Creek gives many examples from his own experience as well as incidents from other very exciting games; one, for instance, that should be noticed by all Wednesdayites, the most exciting cup tie of all time, between West Bromwich Albion and Sheffield Wednesday.

P.H.W.

The Green Continent. Translated from the Spanish and Portuguese by German Arciniegas.

Why is it that Latin America, whose great cities date back to the fifteenth century, should have been so far overtaken by the U.S.A. which was not colonized till the seventeenth You may find hints at the reason in this book which is a collection of translations from various authors designed to give a wide background to those interested in those countries. It seems that one reason is that jungle is a somewhat greater obstacle than prairie; another is nationalism. To many this is an evil, an unwanted obstacle to economic progress, but surely much of the colour and interest in life is founded on it. Lands and their histories, personalities, cities and life are all represented here-the negro of Mexico and the brandy-trader of Patagonia, the life story of coffee, the waterfalls of South America, the saintliness of Rose of Lima and the barbarity of the execution of Tupac- Amaru, Pizaro and a Bolivian sergeant of the civil war. It is not well-known that one of the bloodiest wars in history was fought last century when tiny Paraguay attacked Argentine, Brazil, and Uruguay. She started the war with a population of over a million; all but two hundred thousand of them were killed. If you want to know more about this or about other interesting facts, read this book.

Chess Club

The attendance at our meetings on Friday evenings in the library has been very encouraging, and the tournament we arranged to obtain an idea of order among the players has fulfilled its purpose. We have played two matches against Nether Edge.

We hope to play a match with High Storrs in the near future.

At King Edward VII School on November 29th, 1947.
Result: K.E.S., 2. Nether Edge, 4 - Robinson 0, Tranter 1, Guite 1, Fair 0, Donelly 0, Jennings 0.

At Nether Edge on February 6th, 1948.
Result: Nether Edge, 1. K.E.S., 5 - Robinson l, Tranter 1, Guite l, Taylor 1, Bower 0, Fair l.

War Memorial Fund

We apologize for two errors in the list of contributors published in the December Magazine. "A. E. Dunro " should read " A. E,. Dunn"; and "D. W. Goodison" should read "D. W. Goodwin."

Further contributions have been received from the following:
G. Nicholson,. M. F. Levesley, Mr. and Mrs. Newstead, R. E. Dickinson, S. L. Everitt, F. B. Senior, F. E. Hodgson, W. Barnet, G. Emmott, L. Oldale, A. Todd, W. A. Preen, E. Lewis, W. G. Start, J. E. Adams, W. O. Chapman, T. I. Millward, H. A. Button, B. Mayo, J. L. E. Sutton, H. Creese, E., Prideaux, J. W. Whitaker, A. L. Anderson, E. K. Ryan, G. Needham, W. Askew, G. W. Jenkinson, P. G. Sanderson, R. '. Brooke, J. S. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. G. Start, W. H. Jones, A. E. Hodson, J. Gadsby, N. C. Gyte, C. H. Manterfield, K. C. Manterfield, W. R. Fairest, E. Newall, R. A. White, Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Ashmore, L. J. Cartwright, '. H. Hooper, Prof. R. H. Graveson, W. G. Thompson, R. Halkett, H. A. Scutt, Mr. and Mrs. R. Pearson, Miss Edith Wilson, S. R. Woods, S. Lamb, P. M. Dixon, J. W. Stagg, N. J. Bramah, R. B. Graham, Dr. and Mrs. A. T. Barton, E. B. Love; and proceeds of School Collection, K.E.S.

Dawn

Unfurls the scarlet banner
across the sable sea,
Before the sword of Morning
the sparkling demons flee.
Aurora mounts her chariot,
the pearly chargers leap,
And in his robes of warning
the King steps from the deep.

G. M. MACBETH.

We congratulate the following, who have won university awards since our last issue:
T. E. Kinsey, Open Scholarship for Classics at New College, Oxford;
P. S. Green, Exhibition for Modern Languages at Jesus College, Cambridge;
P. M. Baker, Richards Prize Exhibition for History at Exeter College, Oxford;
P. J. Landin, Minor Scholarship for Mathematics and Physics at Clare College, Cambridge.

Football

 FIRST XI

DAWSON (Goalkeeper). A sound reliable goalkeeper. He has kept goal well.

MASON (Right Back). A sure tackler and has good anticipation, especially in covering up. He will find it an asset to use his left foot.

BIRKINSHAW (Left Back). He has improved as the season went on. A strong kick, a sound tackler and useful with his head. He must learn to stick closer to his wingman. He also will find it an asset to kick with both feet.

NEEDHAM (Right Half). He has earned his place in the team through his relentless tackling and good distribution of the ball. He must learn to keep to his position.

FURNISS (Centre Half). A tower of strength in defence. A fierce tackler and very good with his head. He must learn to restrain the vigorous sliding tackle in the penalty area.

HALLOWS (Left Half). A useful player good with his feet and head. He must learn to restrain his impetuosity.

MOUSLEY (Left Half). He started the season well. A safe tackler and useful with his head. He has a tendency to give up when beaten. Must be quicker on the ball and open the game out more.

GILL (Right Winger). A speedy winger. He has shown determination and has put over some excellent centres. He will improve with practise and must take chances when the opportunity arises.

PETERKEN (Inside Right). He is a constructive player and has good ball control. He must not try to do too much and hold on to the ball too long.

CARLISLE (Centre Forward). He has plenty of dash and a strong right foot shot. He distributes the ball well to his wing. He will have to learn to use his left foot and with more ball control will make a good leader.

WREGHITT (Inside Left). A capable captain, and a tireless worker both in attack and defence. He has been an inspiration to the team.

CROWE (Left Wing). He has filled this difficult position well. He has scored several good goals through opportunism. A good shot and a constructive player.

1sT XI MATCHES

v. High Storrs 1st XI, at High Storrs, Sat., .Jan. 10th.

The side was an experimental one as all our right flank had left school at the end of the Christmas term. At the start, the School opened up a series of attacks, but High Storrs soon settled down and at the interval held a 2 goal lead. After the interval, Peterken reduced this lead, and for a time it looked as if we would pull the game round. However, a miskick by one of our defenders sent the opposing centre-forward away, to score a goal. After this High Storrs took the initiative and added one more goal.

Result: K.E.S., 1. High Storrs, 4.

v. Barnsley G.S. 1st XI at Whiteley Woods, Sat., Jan. 17th.

The School were anxious to avenge their overwhelming defeat by Barnsley earlier in the season. The School played good football and frequently split the Barnsley defence, but were unable to put the ball in the net. Barnsley opened their account with a breakaway goal. As the ding-dong struggle continued. Barnsley gradually asserted their superiority and added 2 more goals, to run out worthy winners.

Result: K.E.S., 0. Barnsley, 3.

v. Chesterfield G.S. at Chesterfield, Wed., Jan. 21st.

The game was played on a very heavy ground which made ball control difficult. At the interval, Chesterfield held a one goal lead. On the resumption, the School settled down to play good football and scored two magnificent goals through Crowe and Gill. The School continued to dictate the terms, but were unfortunate when Dawson in saving a hard shot was adjudged to have fallen over the line with the ball.

Just on time the opposing right wing scored a third goal. The School played well enough to have shared the points.

Result: K.E.S 2. Chesterfield G S 3

v. Sheffield Bankers, at Whiteley Woods, Sat., Jan. 24th.

Conditions were against good football as the ground was very muddy, and many chances were thrown away by both sides. It was not until the second half that the School scored when Crown converted a pass from Wreghitt. Soon after Wreghitt scored, and it looked as if the School would at last register a win. However, the Bankers were awarded a penalty and made no mistake with the kick. Then, with a minute left for play our goalkeeper fumbled, and the Bankers obtained their second goal.

Result: K.E.S., 2. Sheffield Bankers, 2.

v. Ackworth, at Whiteley Woods, Sat., Jan. 31st.

The School attacked from the start and scored a good goal through Carlisle. Immediately afterwards, Ackworth were awarded a penalty, which Dawson saved. Wreghitt added a further goal. After the interval, except for sporadic raids by Ackworth, the School attacked continuously, Crowe and Burkinshaw adding further goals. But for the brilliance of the Ackworth goalkeeper, the score would have been greater.

Result: K.E.S., 4. Ackworth, 0.

v. Mr. Allan's XI, at Abbeydale Park, Wed., Feb. 4th.

Both sides played good football and the School had sufficient chances to have taken the lead. As it was. Mr. Allan's XI showing greater steadiness in front of goal, scored first. After the interval they increased their lead by another goal. Soon after, Wreghitt scored for the School, and from then on the School kept attacking, but were unable to break down the opposition's defence.

Result: K.E.S., 1. Mr. Allan's XI, 2.

v. Firth Park G.S., at Whiteley Woods, Sat., Feb. 14th.

Conditions were bad and the ground soon churned up. Firth Park came near to scoring on two occasions, but it was the School who scored first through Carlisle. Wreghitt added another, but Firth Park came back strongly to open their account with a good goal. The ground was getting worse, and defences caught on the wrong foot could not recover. It was not surprising, therefore, that goals came fairly regularly. At half-time the score was K.E.S., 4, Firth Park, 2, Carlisle having added one for the School, and a Firth Park defender having put through his own goal.

After the interval Crowe netted for the School, but Firth Park were by no means finished, and fought back to make the score 5-4. Towards the end, Crowe and Wreghitt added further goals to make the game safe.

Result: K.E.S., 7. Firth Park G.S., 4.

v. Old Edwardians, at Whiteley Woods, Sat., Feb. 28th.

Result: K.E.S., 5. O.E., 2.

Summary, 1947-8: Played 24. Won 9. Drawn 3. Lost 12. Goals for, 64. Goals against, 72.

SECOND XI

At one time it looked as if the 2nd XI might remain undefeated throughout the season. Unfortunately the continued call for players for the 1st XI weakened the team just enough for narrow- defeats by High Storrs and Barnsley. This was followed later by a heavier defeat by Firth Park, when at least two of the team were not fit enough to play their best. The team was expecting a hard battle in the return game with Barnsley and played well to cross over at half-time one goal up. In the second-half our team obtained three more quick goals and seemed to have settled the match. However, they were then shown that the game is not decided until the final whistle, as our opponents quickly obtained five more. It would not help to describe the mistakes made by individuals, but the whole team must bear the responsibility for losing the match. Both the local teams who defeated us set an example in the way they played together and were quicker on to the ball.

Since the last report, the defence has not changed very considerably. Parnham has been as cool as ever, and usually very good with a tendency to make an occasional bad slip and a hesitation in coming out of his goal when necessary. Lewis has captained the team regularly, and set a good example by his determination and energy. He was usually partnered at back by Jackson who improved towards the end of the season, and played his best match against Firth Park. Hallows continued as a very sound good-tackling centre-half, until he was promoted to the 1st XI, and Bradshaw took his place. It is hoped that with more experience, Bradshaw will make a very successful pivot and be able to control the game, contributing to the initiative of attacking movements to the same extent that his firm tackling has disrupted many threatening attacks. We were sorry to lose Kenny who had become a very promising wing-half, and hope that in his future football he will learn that it is often better to pass the ball before an opponent tackles, rather than to risk a dribbling match with him. At the end of the season we `vere pleased to welcome P. G. Dickens, the Under - 15 Captain, who shows every promise of becoming a really constructive and hard -working wing-half.

The forward line has been very much more unsettled, partly because of the calls of the 1st XI, but also, let us admit it, because there is a great dearth of good forwards in the School. We hope that the junior boys in the School (as well as the seniors) will take notice of this and try to overcome this weakness. Looking back over this season, it is surprising to find how boys who were not even being seriously considered for the 2nd XI at the beginning of the season, have won a regular place in the 1st XI before the end. If you are keen and want a trial, you must let the captain or myself know, and we will try to arrange it for you. Also next season it is hoped to arrange a few matches for a 3rd XI and thus give some games to those who are too old for the Under 15 XI and not quite good enough for the 2nd XI. Of the forwards, since the last report, Forsyth alone has played regularly, and often quite successfully-I think that he has not played quite as well as he is capable, and hope that next season he will be able to find the top of his form. Crowe was usually the other inside-forward, able to seize every opportunity to score, and the team was much weakened when he was promoted towards the end. N. Tebbet played most regularly at centre-forward, and we are sorry that he has left School. After playing well in several games, Gill was promoted to the 1st XI. On the other wing, Stanfield played two very good games and it was most unlucky for the School and for him when he received an injury, just after he had been picked to play for the 1st XI for the first time.

The following list of players states firstly the number of times they have played since the last report and then the total number in the whole season:—Bailey (0, 2), Bradshaw (5, 7), Brown (0, 1), Carlisle (0, 3), Charles (1, 1), Clarke (1, 1), Cowan (0, 1), Crowe (3, 9), Dickens, P. G. (3, 3), Fenton (1, 2), Fletcher (2, 2), Flowers (2, 3), Forsyth (5, 10), Gill (2, 6), Hallows (3, 10), Heeley (1, 1), Illingworth (0, 2), Jackson (5, 6), Kelly (3, 3), Kenny (3, 7), Lewis (6, 13), Marriott (l, 1), Mason (0, 2), May (1, 6), Mousley (2, 2), Needham (1, 5), Parkin (1, 7), Parnham (5, 11), Peterken (0, 4), Prideaux (0, 1), Tebbet (4, 4), Silk (1, 1), Stanfield (2, 3), Thornton (1, 2). Our thanks are due to J. E. Dickens, for having so cheerfully supported the team and run the line at most of the matches during the season, and also to the Football Secretary, Burkinshaw, for having arranged the details of the matches for us.

RESULTS

r. Junior Technical School (away)

Won,

2-0

v. High Storrs G.S. (home) 

Lost,

3-6

v. Barnsley G.S. (away)           

Lost,

4-5

c. Ackworth G.S. (home) 

Won,

9-0

c. Firth Park G.S. (a«-ay) 

Lost,

0-4

v. Old Edwardians 2nd XI (home)

Won

11-1

SUMMARY.

Played 13, Won 10, Lost 3. Goals for, 65, against 26.

UNDER 15 XI

Played 6, Won 0, Drawn 0, Lost 6, Goals for, 5; against, 34.

UNDER 14 X1

v.

v.

v.

c.

Derby G.S.

High Storrs G.S.

Barnsley G.S.

Southey Green

Firth Park G.S.

Won,

Lost,

Lost,

Lost,

Lost.

3-1

0-2

1-5

1-4

0-5

Played 12. Won 3. Drawn 2, Lost 7. Goals for, 20; against, 37.

P.J.W.

House Notes

 ARUNDEL.

After our defeat in the Knock-Out by Clumber, the 1st XI strove for the first eleven cup, but despite a very good second round, when they carried all before them, were only second to Sherwood, who beat us on points taking_ both rounds into consideration. The 2nd XI did very well too and finished third. The 3rd XI, after some very dour struggles, finished third also. So on the whole the teams have done very well and must be congratulated. We are glad to see that there are a lot of promising boys in the lower school. At the moment the House is busily practising for the Standard Sports and the Cross Country, which is usually our favourite event. We hope to have acquired one if not both Cross Country cups by the time the Magazine is published. Training for Water Polo has been going on steadily and the prospects for next term are good, as are the prospects for cricket, where we hope to retain the Knock-Out cup and come out much higher in the first eleven league than we did last year. The prospects for the Athletic Sports early next term are good also, especially if as many boys as possible enter and gain standard time and those extra points that are so helpful in the result. Congratulations are due to Carlisle and -Needham for gaining places in the School 1st XI. to Bradshaw who played several times for the School 1st XI, and to Gregory on obtaining a place in the Under 14 Cross Country team.

CHATSWORTH.

The Magazine goes to press, unfortunately, before the main athletic events of the term-the Cross Country and newly instituted Standard Sports-have taken place: and in these, we hope, lies our true glory. It is not to be found this year in league or knock-out football, although this term has shown an improvement on last, all our teams standing about the middle of their respective leagues instead of at the latter end. Individual members of the House, however, have played very good football; Gill must be mentioned for his inclusion in the School 1st XI, and Gill. Fenton, and Forsyth for their appearances in the 2nd XI. In swimming, under the management of Law, the House 2nd Polo team played very steadily and finished in the middle of their league. The prospect for cricket and the Athletic Sports is an entirely uncertain quantity as our teams and runners are in the main young and untried, but as they will remain unaltered for some time the future should be bright. The House would like to congratulate Gill on becoming a Kings Scout, and Kinsey on winning an Open Classical Scholarship at New College, Oxford.

CLUMBER.

The House has not had a very good season at football as far as the league teams were concerned, although there has been a marked improvement during the last half-term in all three elevens. At the end of last term, however, the House Knock-Out XI surpassed all expectations by beating Arundel and thus winning the trophy. This was our third successive final, and proves the old saying that " third time counts for all." We extend our congratulations to J. B. Crowe on being selected for the School 1st XI. We are looking forward to the Athletic Sports and are hoping once again to carry off the honours. This can be done if everybody pulls his weight. The junior Water Polo team has done quite well, finishing about half-way up the league table.

They are playing well together and they should be very useful in building up a senior team for the League and Knock-Out next term.

HADDON.

We have had a bad season in football this year. especially in the 1st XI, --here more House spirit would be welcomed. The 1st XI finished at the foot of the league; the 2nd XI slid a little better, finishing fifth; and the 3rd XI finished eighth. We are now, at the time of writing, training for the Cross Country and practising for the Standard Sports. -Next term we hope for a change for the better with the Athletic Sports and the cricket season; maybe there are people in the House who can play cricket better than football; let us hope so. Finally we would like to offer our congratulations to P. J. Landin on winning a Scholarship at Clare College, Cambridge.

LYNWOOD.

House football has been, on the whole, very satisfactory. Despite losing four players to fill a depleted 1st XI, the 2nd XI have retained the league cup in grand style. The 1st XI. although losing Cowan, Jepson and Harrison at the end of last term, have finished fifth, largely due to the keenness of the younger members of the team. Kalman has been appointed House swimming captain in succession to O. R. Hiller. and we hope that he and all the swimmers in Lynwood -will have a very successful season next term. At the end of this term we are losing Wheen and J. P. Peterken. The former has very ably captained the football and cricket 2nd XI's for the last two years, while Peterken has been the mainstay of the 1st XI for even longer. We wish them, and all others who may be leaving, every success in their future careers. In conclusion we look forward to a successful running season and remind the House, particularly the older members, that teamwork must be our motto.

SHERWOOD.

After a long period during which the House has remained near the bottom of the league tables, we can exhibit with pride our three newly won cups, namely, the football 1st and 3rd XI's, and Water Polo 2nd league. We are sorry, however, to lose Kenny, a staunch member of our football and cricket XI's for several years, who has left to join the 'Merchant -Navy. At the end of last term, we said goodbye to Dowling. who was also a leading figure in the sporting activities of the House, and who gained his 1st XI colours for football. Congratulations are due to Mason. who has been doing good work for the School 1st XI, on being elected House Athletics Captain. We look forward to the Standard and Athletic Sports with some degree of confidence. Good results are expected from the younger members of the House especially. In spite of a sadly depleted cricket team, we hope to have a successful season, relying on the younger members, in whom we can see much promise, to fill the gaps.

WELBECK.

Fortunately, owing to favourable weather conditions, it has been possible to finish the second round of the football league. Unfortunately, Welbeck have not excelled themselves, and our position in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd leagues are, respectively, fifth, fourth and second. -Now that the football season has ended, the whole House is entering into the Standard Sports and Cross Country with great enthusiasm. We hope that the traditional team spirit of Welbeck will be shown at its very best in these events, where team effort will triumph over individual brilliance every time. W e should like to conclude by offering our hearty congratulations to Baker on obtaining an Exhibition at Exeter College. Oxford, and also by bidding a fond farewell to the two Tebbets, whom we thank for all they have done for Welbeck.

WENTWORTH.

This term has seen the completion of the second round of the league competition, which has definitely benefited Wentworth. As I wrote in the last issue, all the teams were on the threshold of all-round improvement, and only a few more games were necessary for this to be translated into the reality of points and goals. The 1st XI maintained a consistently high standard of play and finished up in third place. Clark has captained the XI very enthusiastically and Hallows has proved a tower of strength at centre-half , and is to be congratulated on being selected for the School 1st XI. The 2nd XI were finally placed second in the table, and if the 1st XI had not annexed so many of their stalwarts they would no doubt have been elevated to even dizzier heights. The 3rd XI suffered many narrow defeats and finished up in fifth place. The Athletic Sports will soon he upon us, and if our newly appointed Athletics Captain, Ogley, can encourage our promising runners to put in some serious training we should hold our own and even challenge the supremacy of certain other Houses. The prospects for the cricket season are very good, and we are fortunate in being able to retain practically the same team as last year; it would be a good idea if members of the 1st XI worked off the initial stiffness during the Easter holidays, which would enable us to get off to a successful start. Finally I should like to congratulate M. Cole, J. M. Jacobs and H. Holmes on becoming King's Scouts.

 House League Competitions     

RESULTS OF SECOND SERIES.

COMBINED RESULTS OF TWO SERIES.

 

 

 

 

 

GOALS 

 

 

 

 

 

GOALS

 

 

P.

W.

D.

L.

For

Agt

Pts.

 

P.

W.

D.

L.

For

Agt.

Pts.

FIRST X1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIRST XI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arundel 

7

6

1

0

32

5

13

Sherwood

14

12

1

1

58

21

25

Sherwood

7

6

0

1

21

9

12

Arundel

 14

10

2

2

67

24

22

Wentworth

7

5

1

1

29

13

11

Wentworth

 14

8

1

5

49

40

17

Chatsworth

7

4

0

3

28

24

S

Chatsworth

14

7

0

7

52

44

14

Lynwood

7

2

0

5

14

24

4

Lynwood

14

6

0

8

3S

42

12

Clumber

7

1

1

5

16

28

3

Welbeck

 14

5

1

8

26

46

11

Welbeck

7

1

1

5

7

20

3

Clumber

14

2

3

9

36

56

7

Haddon 

7

1

0

6

16

40

2

Haddon

 14

2

0

12

25

78

4

SECOND X1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECOND XI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lynwood 

7

6

0

1

36

16

12

Lynwood

 14

12

1

1

69

30

25

Sherwood

7

5

0

2

35

14

10

Wentworth

 14

8

2

4

59

31

1S

Haddon 

 

5

0

2

25

13

10

Arundel

 14

S

1

5

6 7

39

17

Wentworth

7

4

1

2

35

13

9

Sherwood

14

7

2

5

52

28

16

Welbeck

7

3

1

3

27

30

 

Haddon 

14

8

0

6

45

36

16

Arundel

 

3

0

4

33

2S

6

Welbeck

14

6

2

6

58

S4

14

Clumber

 

1

0

6

10

49

2

Clumber

 14

2

0

12

30

99

4

Chatsworth

 

0

0

7

9

47

0

Chatsworth

 14

1

0

13

18

S1

2

THIRD XI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THIRD XI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sherwood

 

 

2

0

61

9

12

Sherwood

 14

12

2

0

93

21

26

Welbeck 

7

5

0

1

42

11

12

Welbeck 

14

1 2

0

2

79

27

24

Arundel 

7

4

1

 

27

12

9

Arundel

14

9

1

4

56

28

19

Wentworth

7

2

2

3

15

19

6

Lynwood

14

6

0

8

40

57

12

Chatsworth

7

3

0

4

12

38

6

Wentworth

14

4

3

7

32

34

11

Clumber

 

2

1

4

22

29

5

Chatsworth

14

3

2

9

27

S1

S

Lynwood

7

2

0

5

14

38

4

Clumber 

14

3

1

10

35

64

7

Haddon 

 

1

0

6

12

49

2

Haddon 

14

2

1

11

33

83

 

  

  

  

 "JOURNEYS END''

by R. C. SHERRIFF


Characters in order of appearance:

Captain hardy P. M. BAKER
Lieutenant Osborne I. M FLOWERS
Private Mason G. S. FINLAYSON
Lance-Corporal Broughton J. S. BINGHAM
2nd Lieutenant Raleigh L. MAY
Captain Stanhope C. B. DAWSON
2nd Lieutenant Trotter P. PETERKEN
2nd Lieutenant Hibbert H. R. WINDLE
The Company Sergeant-Major G. M. MACBETH
The Colonel W. R. LAYLAND
A German Soldier J. M. DAWSON

The Scene is laid in a dug-out in the British trenches before St. Quentin, March, 1918.

ACT I. Monday evening.

ACT II. Scene 1. Tuesday morning.

Scene 2. Tuesday afternoon.

ACT III. Scene 1. Wednesday afternoon.

Scene 2. Wednesday night.

Scene 3. Thursday, towards dawn.

There will be an interval of ten minutes after ACT II.


The Play produced by E. F. WATLING.

Setting by C. HELLIWELL.

Uniforms and equipment by CHAS. H. FOX LTD.

Stage Manager: A. C. JOHANSSON.

Assistants: E. BURKINSHAW, M. A. ROBINSON, M. R. G. KENT, C. J. RICHARDSON.

Lighting: H. REDSTON, P. W. SMITH, L. J. HUNT, I. FELLS.

Business Manager: C. J. MAGRATH.

FOREWORD

Ten years elapsed after the end of the First World War before the first serious dramatic work inspired by that experience reached the stage, and a tentative experiment by an unknown writer became the most famous and successful play of its age. Translated into every civilised tongue, it went round the world as a complete expression of the tragedy, and the incidental comedies, of twentieth-century war-or more particularly of war as an incident in the lives of a handful of ordinary, unheroic and peaceful-minded men. R. C. Sherriff's only other successful play, Badger's Green, is a pleasant comedy about the little tragedies of a village cricket club. Journey's End owes some of its appeal to the same flair for the trivial humours that can illuminate even the most sombre surroundings; but its message as a whole is stern, and we offer it with a sense of its significance for a second generation touched by events even more catastrophic, though not greatly different, in their personal impact, from those which their fathers experienced.

 PREVIOUS PRODUCTIONS ON THIS STAGE.

School D.S. - 1927, THE RIVALS. 1928, TWELFTH NIGHT. 1929, LE VOYAGE DE M. PERRICHON. 19.30, LIONEL AND CLARISSA. 1931, THE IMAGINARY INVALID. 1932, THE ACHARNIANS. 1933, HENRY IV, PART I. 1934, THE ALCHEMIST. 1935, TRIAL BY JURY, THIRTY MINUTES IN A STREET and FATHER NOAH. 1937, HAMLET. 1938, LOLANTHE. 1940, CHARLEY'S AUNT. 1941, THE LITTLE MAN and PLAYBOX. 1942, THE RIVALS. 1911, BADGER'S GREEN. 1945, BIRD IN HAND. 1946, THE APPLE CART.

Staff D.S. - 1927, THE RISING GENERATION. 1928. TILLY OF BLOOMSBURY. 1929, THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST. 1930, AMBROSE APPLEJOHN'S ADVENTURE. 1931, THE SPORT OF KINGS. 1932, BIRD IN HAND. 1933, ARMS AND THE MAN. 1934, THE PATH OF GLORY. 1937, LABURNUM GROVE. 1941, TWO GENTLEMEN OF SOHO.

Old Edwardians D.S. - 1929, OFFICER 666. 1930, THE PRIVATE SECRETARY. 1931, RAFFLES. 1932, THE FOURTH WALL. 1933. AREN'T WE ALL? 1935, R.U.R. 1936, THE APPLE CART. 1940, PADDY THE NEXT BEST THING.